Panic

(redirected from Homosexual panic)
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Panic

1. See: Bank panic.

2. See: Panic buying.

3. See: Panic selling.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hetero-masculine drag, homosociality, and homosexual panic
(35) Christina Pei-Lin Chen, Note, Provocation's Privileged Desire: The Provocation Doctrine, "Homosexual Panic, " and the Non-Violent Unwanted Sexual Advance Defense, 10 CORNELL J.
When I speak of homosexual panic and homosocial desire I must, of course, refer to Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's analysis of male friendship and the definitional crisis surrounding it.
(8.) Giles, "Institutionalization of Homosexual Panic," 240.
When Mison was writing, the connection between the homosexual panic defense and widespread revulsion and bigotry in larger society was practically undeniable; since that time, however, societal attitudes towards homosexuality have been slowly changing.
Chapter four, "East to South: Homosexual Panic, the Old Country, and No Name in the Street," rereads No Name against the overwhelming negative reception it received by critics.
The world of the nineteenth-century realist novel resembles the heteronormative world of its author and audience; consequently, reconciling these bachelors to this world and its values involves Seth, rather like Silas after him, undergoing a socially acceptable neutering process of "sexual anesthesia" and bachelor "domestication" and Dino dying passively (and perhaps deservedly) to diffuse the "homosexual panic" he occasions--although Eliot, often relying on unexamined or naturalized assumptions about enthusiasm and male sexuality she shared with her reader, would obviously neither have recognized those exact terms nor have consciously managed their effect in the ways I shall describe (Sedgwick, 1990, 188, 199, 19-21).
Beginning in the late 1960s, American courts have recognized "homosexual panic" as a legal defense.
Though Sedgwick nods towards lesbian literary history in this passage, she underplays its important status in her discussion of homosexual panic. Her description of an idealized 'continuum' of 'women loving women', however well-intentioned, obscures the sexual dimension of lesbian desire, 'its incorrigibly lascivious surge towards the body of another woman' (Castle: 11).
But it isn't long before the humor reaches lowest common denominators level, much of it, strangely enough, centering on the theme of homosexual panic. From the quartet's disturbing encounter with a gay motorcycle cop (funnily played by the normally macho John C.
Conclusion: Getting to the Depths of "Homosexual Panic"
However, repressed desires and homosexual panic lead to hysteria and self-destruction in both Quentin and Henry.