Homo Economicus

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Homo Economicus

A person that desires to maximize his/her needs or desires. Homo economicus is used most of the time to refer to the rational economic actor, who desires wealth, does not desire to work if it can be avoided, and is able to find ways achieve those ends. This assumption is accepted by many economists, especially those who follow rational choice theory, but it remains controversial. The concept of homo economicus was developed by utilitarian thinkers, and contrasts with the constructs of behavioral economics.
References in periodicals archive ?
En líneas generales el trabajo puede dividirse en dos partes bien diferenciadas: en la primera parte se identificarán las características desde la Teoría del Consumidor Neoclásica de un Agente Económico Representativo u Homo-Economicus y se señalan las críticas a los supuestos subyacentes; en la segunda parte se desarrollarán de manera resumida las ventajas de incorporar en la definición de agente económico las características del hombre (Dasein) desde la concepción de Heidegger, en palabras del propio filósofo: "Las diversas disciplinas muestran hoy por doquier la tendencia a establecer nuevos fundamentos para su investigación.
Retomando la perspectiva histórica se pueden identificar un conjunto de críticas a los supuestos que subyacen en el Homo-Economicus, la mayor parte de ellas puede profundizarse en Boldeman (2007):
En otras palabras cambiar al Homo-Economicus por un Dasein-Economicus, lo cual implicaría repensar a los agentes económicos según Carpio (1984) en función de: ".
99) This assertion of the self saw the coming-of-age of homo-economicus, with the revolution not only won by the bourgeoisie, (100) but also formative of the bourgeoisie (101) as a distinct class with interests of its own.
155) This atomization of society into individuals is evident in the neoliberal transformation of homo-economicus from a creature of exchange, to a creature of competition.
Whereas the classic liberal account of homo-economicus was primarily concerned with notions of mutual co-dependence through exchange, neoliberalism places a greater emphasis on competition, viewing homo-economicus as a creature 'whose tendency to compete must be fostered.
In general the paper can be divided in two well differentiated parts: in the first part the characteristics will be identified from the Neoclassical Consumer Theory of Representative Economy Agent or Homo-Economicus and the critics are indicated to the underlying assumptions; in the second part the advantages will be developed in a summarized way to incorporate in the definition of economy agent the characteristics of man (Dasein) from Heidegger's conception, in the words of the philosopher himself: " the diverse disciplines show everywhere the tendency today to establish new foundations for their research.
Retaking the historical perspective it is possible to identify a set of critics to the assumptions that underlie in the Homo-Economicus, most of them can be deepened in Boldeman (2007):
In other words to change the Homo-Economicus for a Dasein-Economicus, which would imply to rethink the economics agents according to Carpio (1984) based on: ".
Homo-economicus occupies centre stage and, following Brennan and Lomasky (1993), homo-economicus can be described by three axioms: (a) that the individual is rational; (b) that the individual is egoistic; (c) that egoism takes the form of economic self-interest in narrowly defined terms (i.
For some time, it has been clear that the predicted behavior of homo-economicus is not the behavior of individuals in experimental economics.
although homo-economicus may be a useful abstraction in explaining market behavior, he is unlikely to be as useful in a theory of electoral politics.