Hezbollah

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Hezbollah

A Shi'a Muslim political party and paramilitary organization in Lebanon. Hezbollah was established in the 1980s in response to the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982. It operates a number of social services, though some countries regard it as a terrorist organization. It was responsible for the capture and killing of two Israeli soldiers in a cross-border raid, an incident that led to the 2006 Israel-Lebanon War. This war, and Hezbollah's response to it, increased the organization's popularity in Lebanon among Sunni Muslims, Christians and others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Iran's funding of Hizbollah militias was slashed once again between 2014 and 2016 following economic pressure due to toughened sanctions by the international community, says the report.
That is precisely why Hizbollah has not responded the way it typically does to Israeli provocations.
Placing Hizbollah on the terrorist list would be the next logical step, in light of the terrorist attack on European soil.
Talks lasted almost two years and Hizbollah has stayed impassive under pressure.
This paper examines the radicalization process of Turkish Islamists, with a specific focus on the terrorist organization Hizbollah, often referred to as Kurdish Hizbollah to distinguish it from the Lebanese group using the same name.
The cease-fire was hailed by some as a victory for Hizbollah, in that they were able to resist Israel's might, supposedly enhancing the prestige of this militant group among Arabs angered by the high civilian death toll.
Ahmadinejad told a cheering crowd in north western Iran Hizbollah had foiled plans "to create the so-called new Middle East under the domination of the US, Britain and Zionists".
Israel's massive assault hasn't deterred Hizbollah from continuing its hit-and-run rocket attacks.
Members of Hizbollah have become members of the government for the first time, magnifying the importance of the relationship between Iran and the Lebanese Shi'ite movement.
Both are accused of working together to derail the peace efforts between the Palestinians and Israel by providing assistance to Hizbollah, Hamas, and other radical groups.
There is the fear that both Sharon and Hizbollah could spoil things if the former presses the Lebanese to disarm the latter while the situation in Lebanon is in a state of flux, or if Hizbollah becomes an extension of Syria in confronting Israel through Lebanese territory.
For its part, Hizbollah has vowed to keep up attacks on Israeli troops occupying the Shebaa Farms, although the region is recognized internationally as Syrian territory, not Lebanese.