Heavily Indebted Poor Countries

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Heavily Indebted Poor Countries

The 40 least developed countries with a large amount of foreign debt. The IMF and the World Bank help heavily indebted poor countries restructure their debt by offering low interest loans and some forms of debt relief. The two organizations have offered this service since 1996.
References in periodicals archive ?
New Ways of Achieving Debt Sustainability beyond the Enhanced HIPC Initiative.
Debt Overhang and Economic Growth in HIPC Countries: The Case of Southern African Development Community (SADC).
See Muse-Fisher, supra note 21, at 1696 (explaining that, unlike Zambia and Liberia, Argentina does not qualify as an HIPC and thus would not be protected by UK-like legislation).
Here are seven reasons why the individual market players outside the public exchange system may still be able to outmaneuver the new PPACA HIPCs, or at least carve out a lucrative, stable market of their own -- reasons why this may be the start of a rebirth of the off-exchange individual health insurance market, at least in states that let the off-exchange market continue to exist.
HIPC debt relief is provided in stages, based on each
From the outset HIPC II aimed "to provide faster, deeper, and broader debt relief and strengthen the links between debt relief, poverty reduction, and social policies" (IMF 2010a).
Under the HIPC Initiative, originally launched by the IMF and World Bank in 1996, expectations of creditor participation extended to multilateral, official bilateral, and commercial creditors.
Current projections show that once all 40 HIPCs reach the completion point, the MDRI will result in the cancellation of $48 billion over the life of the loans and that the HIPC initiative will provide approximately $98 billion in relief.
In 1996, the World Bank and IMF launched a debt relief program under the HIPC Initiative to assist the poorest countries with unsustainable debt burdens.
To bring about a reduction in their multilateral debt, the HIPCs needed to go through a series of stages in which they would enact various neoliberal reforms.
He includes consideration of how such debt reduction efforts have increased the influx of new capital and investment as he reviews the origins of such debts and the means by which HIPCs received relief, the efficiency and effectiveness of a range of types of debt relief, the impact of debt relief since 2000 and prospects of further debt relief in the future.
We welcome the steps already taken by the Paris Club to address this problem, urge all sovereign creditors not to on-sell claims on HIPCs, and are examining additional steps that might be taken.