Higher Education Act of 1965


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Higher Education Act of 1965

Legislation in the United States that increased federal funding for colleges and universities. It also created the Pell grant, Stafford loan, PLUS loan, and similar programs to make post-secondary education more affordable for students. It has been reauthorized and amended several times since its original passage. It was part of the larger Great Society movement in the United States.
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The College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007 (Public Law 110-84) reduces interest rates on student loans and makes other amendments to the Higher Education Act of 1965 to make college more accessible and affordable.
(i) A loan made to the parents of a dependent student under section 428B of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C.
The Higher Education Act of 1965 included Title III- strengthening Developing Institutions with 22% of funds set aside for junior colleges (78).
My Administration has worked diligently to uphold the 1998 amendments to the Higher Education Act of 1965, Section 307, offering aid to minority institutions to address the under-representation of minorities in science and technological fields.
Known as the Higher Education Act of 1965, these assistance programs included Educational Opportunity Grants (issued directly to post-secondary institutions to make "vigorous efforts" to identify and recruit students with "exceptional financial need"), a Work-Study Program to subsidize on-campus student employment and the Guaranteed Student Loan Program (GSL) (10).
It amends the Higher Education Act of 1965 to exempt courses offered through telecommunications from certain limitations on student financial assistance with respect to correspondence courses.
(B) You establish a customer relationship with an individual under a program authorized by Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C.
An eligible educational institution is defined by the Higher Education Act of 1965 and generally includes any accredited post-secondary educational institution in the United States, undergraduate and graduate.
The student loan program came into being with the Higher Education Act of 1965. Until then, banks had balked at lending money to 18-year-olds with no credit history or collateral.
Major tax legislation Congress passed as part of balanced budget legislation in 1997 marks the most significant federal initiative for post-secondary student aid since the Higher Education Act of 1965, which established needs-based grants (now Pell grants) for college tuition.
Starting with passage of the Higher Education Act of 1965, the Federal government has guaranteed student loans extended by private banks.
Like other Great Society programs that assumed sufficient wealth for guns and butter, the Higher Education Act of 1965 set ambitious policy goals of both universal access and choice of institutions.

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