Hezbollah

(redirected from Hezballah)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Hezbollah

A Shi'a Muslim political party and paramilitary organization in Lebanon. Hezbollah was established in the 1980s in response to the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1982. It operates a number of social services, though some countries regard it as a terrorist organization. It was responsible for the capture and killing of two Israeli soldiers in a cross-border raid, an incident that led to the 2006 Israel-Lebanon War. This war, and Hezbollah's response to it, increased the organization's popularity in Lebanon among Sunni Muslims, Christians and others.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
(50.) Thomas, "Hezballah, Israel, and Cyber Psyop"; and AFDD 2-5: Information Operations, 30.
According to the Patterns in Global Terrorism 2003 report, despite some cooperation on al Qaeda and the Taliban, Syria continues to provide political and material support to "Palestinian rejectionist groups," including Hezballah, Hamas, and Palestinian Islamic Jihad.
To be sure, Hezballah's legitimate argument centered around occupied territories at the ShibaEoACAyah Farms and the Kfar Shubah Hills along with parts of the village of Ghajar and, more important, of the failed duty of the state to liberate them.
officials and Members of Congress have blamed Syria for acting as a conduit for the transfer of rockets and other arms to Hezballah units, thereby enabling Hezbollah units to engage in military action against Israeli targets.
Moreover, he also called on security forces to "prevent the blocking of roads and protect the embassies of the friendly and brotherly countries, especially Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey and Syria." In addition to Suleiman, Progressive Socialist Party chief Walid Jumblatt notified the Meqdad family via Hezballah that it would "react severely" to the kidnapping of any Syrian in Druze areas of Lebanon, while Al Mustaqbal [Future] Movement along with Salafi clerics warned of any problems in Sunni areas too.
The entry of the Palestinian Hamas and the Lebanese Hezballah movements into the formal political process also has fueled U.S.
Hezballah denied that Hassan was affiliated with the movement although Maher Meqdad claimed that he could field an "armed wing," and that his clan had taken matters into its own hands as the Lebanese government proved incapable of addressing their concerns.
According to the State Department's Patterns in Global Terrorism 2002 report, despite some cooperation on al Qaeda, Syria continues to host and support terrorist groups, including Hezballah, Hamas, and Palestinian Islamic Jihad.