hereditament

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Related to Hereditaments: incorporeal hereditaments

hereditament

Any real or personal property that may be inherited. It would not include a life estate in oneself—meaning a right to land during one's own life but no longer—because that obviously can't be inherited.The word had more importance under older English law because of the ability to place a greater variety of restrictions on land than is possible today.It is often encountered in wills, leaving “all my lands, tenements and hereditaments to my daughter… .“ As a practical matter,only the word “hereditament”is necessary because it includes the other two.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(87) The Cecils were successively Masters of the Court of Wards and Liveries and their job was to "survey and dispose of all and every of our Wards, Idiots, and Lunatiques, and respectively, of their Lands, Tenements, Hereditaments, Chattels, goods, properties, interests, rights, titles, Intrusions, Arrearages and Mean-rates, and all Liveries, Ouster le maines, and ancient Mannors, and all Advowsons, and presentations of Churches, Herriots, Reliefes, Coppyholds, Woods, Mines, and Quarries, of any of our Wards, and of all duties belonging, or to belong to us by reason of any Tenure": Ley, A5r.
An alternative option to removing the lowest value hereditaments, the FSB says, would involve radically improving the operation of small business rate relief (SBRR).
(79) Mary Sokol, 'Bentham and Blackstone on Incorporeal Hereditaments' (1994) 15 Journal of Legal History 287,287.
The grant of lands to the school included 'all those fields, meadows and pastures, and hereditaments, whatsover with the appurtenances, called or known by the name or names of Long-Croft, Bynges, Rotton-fields, Walmores, and Saint Mary Wood lying and being in the Foreign of Birmingham'.
William Blackstone defined private nuisance as "any thing done to the hurt or annoyance of the lands, tenements, or hereditaments of another." 3 WILLIAM BLACKSTONE, COMMENTARIES *216.
Nevertheless, the relevant standardized forms clearly change over time; no real estate lawyer today knows much about the dizzying array of "incorporeal hereditaments" that Blackstone described (e.g., advowsons, dignities, and corodies), whereas Blackstone knew nothing of condominium restrictions and time-shares.
A general term for lands, tenements, and hereditaments; property which, on the death of the owner intestate, passes to his heir.
and all manors, lands, tenements and other hereditaments belonging to them ...
There are complicated proposals relating to splits, mergers and changes to existing hereditaments, such as extensions and whether they qualify as new build.
Thus, the customary rotational grazing system became a "right of common in pasture"; the right to feed pigs on acorns became a "right of pannage"; the custom of taking wood became "estovers"; the customary fishing hole became a "common piscary." (70) Custom was transformed into a series of "incorporeal hereditaments"--inheritable, intangible property such as profits a' prendre.