H

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Related to Henry: Henry VIII, Henry Ford

H

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that the issue is the second preferred bond of the company.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

H

Used in stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate that during the day's activity the stock traded at a new 52-week high price.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
"And aren't you very cold?" Henry inquired, placing coal on the fire, drawing a chair up to the grate, and laying aside her cloak.
But since her engagement to Rodney, Henry's feeling towards her had become rather complex; equally divided between an impulse to hurt her and an impulse to be tender to her; and all the time he suffered a curious irritation from the sense that she was drifting away from him for ever upon unknown seas.
Henry did not reply, but munched on in silence, until, the meal finished, he topped it with a final cup a of coffee.
"I'm thinking you're down in the mouth some," Henry said.
'Lucy's governess is not the only lucky person who has had money left her,' Henry answered.
Henry suspended his search, and glanced at the prospectus.
Finally she was dressed, and when she went into the sitting-room there was Uncle Henry in his blue satin, walking gravely up and down the room.
For an hour or more we went on feeling about, till at last Sir Henry and I gave it up in despair, having been considerably hurt by constantly knocking our heads against tusks, chests, and the sides of the chamber.
He was looking worried, and when he heard Lord Henry's last remark, he glanced at him, hesitated for a moment, and then said, "Harry, I want to finish this picture to-day.
Henry felt in no mood for fencing with De Fulm, who, like the other sycophants that surrounded him, always allowed the King easily to best him in every encounter.
"If I buckled it around my waist and commanded it to take me to Uncle Henry, wouldn't it do it?"
A ball itself could not have been more welcome to Catherine than this little excursion, so strong was her desire to be acquainted with Woodston; and her heart was still bounding with joy when Henry, about an hour afterwards, came booted and greatcoated into the room where she and Eleanor were sitting, and said, "I am come, young ladies, in a very moralizing strain, to observe that our pleasures in this world are always to be paid for, and that we often purchase them at a great disadvantage, giving ready-monied actual happiness for a draft on the future, that may not be honoured.