Helms-Burton Act

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Helms-Burton Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1996, that strengthened the existing trade embargo on Cuba. The U.S. had prohibited most trade with Cuba since 1960. The Act extended this prohibition to companies doing business with Cuba and to companies that use property Cuba had nationalized from American companies. The Act was quite controversial internationally.
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The move comes a day after the White House announced it would stop issuing waivers on implementing the Helms-Burton law, which would penalize anyone in the world who did business with Cuban entities using property seized from US owners following the 1959 Cuban revolution.
For years, the legislative handiwork of two Republicans (the so-called Helms-Burton law) tied any president's hands on travel and trade policies with Cuba.
This event forced President Clinton into signing the Cuban exile-supported Helms-Burton Law. In Canada, the shooting down of civilian aircraft was deplored, but at the same time Cuba's claim that it was defending its air space seemed a reasonable cause of concern for the Cuban state, though an unfortunate policy response.
26), through the passage of the Helms-Burton Law in 1996, which aimed at punishing TNCs and foreign corporations doing business in Cuba (p.
Under the Helms-Burton Law, US companies are prohibited from supplying services to Cuban individuals or companies.
The Helms-Burton Law (LIBERTAD Act of 1996, Public Law 104-14, 110 Stat.
The embargo was further systematized by the "Cuban Liberty and Democracy Solidarity Act" (Helms-Burton Law) of March 1996, which aimed to harden the "international" sanctions against Cuba.
As part of an understanding reached between the European Union and the United States in 1998 to resolve the dispute, the Clinton administration agreed to seek changes to the Helms-Burton law to allow a permanent waiver for European companies.
And as recently as last year, Spanish Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar, for example, made a point of staying at a Havana hotel run by a Spanish company, Sol Melia, which in the past has been threatened with action under the Helms-Burton law.President Bush's waiver failed to draw the ire of many of the same Cuban-American leaders who roundly criticised his Bill Clinton for the same action in 1996.
Another Reich organization, the US-Cuba Business Council, has received more than $520,000 in US Agency for International Development money for anti-Castro work supporting the goals of the Helms-Burton law. If he's confirmed, Reich would become the key policy-maker interpreting and implementing legislation on Cuba, which he was handsomely paid to promote--a clear conflict of interest.
Have we become such a threat that legislative redress, as mentioned by Brian Unger (the associate western executive director for the DGA), will be brought in, tantamount to the Helms-Burton Law (U.S.