Advance Directive

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Related to Health care proxy: Durable power of attorney

Advance Directive

A legal document expressing a person's medical wishes in the event of his/her mental or physical incapacity. An advance directive is made while the director is still competent, and comes into effect at incapacity. An advance directive may state whether or not the director wishes to be placed on life support or to receive a particular treatment. It may or may not assign another party, usually a family member, to make these decisions as they come up. It is important to note that in this situation, an advance directive is not a power of attorney and neither allows the other party access to the assignor's finances, nor obliges him/her to pay for any treatment. See also: Proxy directive.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(20.) See generally Health Care Proxy Form and Information, MASS.
Getting a later start than that of the power of attorney, the health care proxy was first codified in New York State in 1991.
Jackie receives referrals to LGBT-knowledgeable lawyers and decides to complete the health care proxy and hospital visitation form.
A medical power of attorney--also called a durable power of attorney for health care, health care proxy or appointment of health care agent--is a legal document in which you name a person to make medical decisions for you any time you are unable to make your own medical decisions.
Q: How does a living will work, and how is it different from a health care proxy?
Proxy--the person who is legally authorized to make health care decisions on the patient's behalf in circumstances where the patient lacks capacity to make such decisions, including, but not limited to, a health care proxy appointed in a health care directive.
Everyone should create a will, establish a health care proxy and specify guardianship arrangements if they have children.
You need up to three others: a health care proxy, a guardian designation, and a HIPAA release.
This article discusses the concept of capacity, various relevant mandates, and a rationale for the assessment of capacity to execute a health care proxy. Some specific New York State regulations, pertaining to the execution of a health care proxy by persons who have intellectual disabilities, are presented and contrasted with regulations in some other jurisdictions.
Second, the health care proxy who is named now can make whatever medical decisions the patient would make if he or she were able.
Recently, the term "advance directives" has become synonymous with the health care proxy document--a form available in most health care settings in which individuals can state future medical treatment preferences and name a surrogate or proxy to carry out those decisions in the event of incapacity.

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