Headline


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Headline

A brief statement at the beginning of an article, usually in larger type than the rest of the article, that describes what the article will state. Headlines are often abbreviated and may be deliberately sensational, especially in tabloids. A famous example of a headline occurred during the Great Crash in 1929, when Variety magazine reported, "WALL ST. LAYS AN EGG."
References in periodicals archive ?
I was worried going into it maybe headlines are boring.
Goodbye, Human Race" reads a headline at the top of The Huffington Post.
But it's not like we haven't tried to get them to write their own headlines.
Get a checkup at the Emotional Marketing Value Headline Analyzer from the Advanced Marketing Institute.
A headline like: "Woman Killer at Large", could refer to either "a killer of women" or "a woman who kills".
The underlined infinitive used in the headline conveys a directive sense and indicates futurity.
The headline was eventually removed, and ESPN was forced to apologize Saturday.
On Monday February 7, the headline should have been 'Kung Hey Fat Choy' with the fabulous photograph of the celebrations which took place in Chinatown the day before.
In this article we re-examine the short-term dynamics between headline and core measures of inflation over a longer sample period of 1959-2007.
It's the online aspect that's creating much current discussion, if not confusion: is headline style online any different from in print?
Increasing Social Security tax on wealthiest could raise billions" reads a four-column headline at the top of the front page of the Charleston Gazette.
It's flattering to make the big time in this fashion, but Kerry's ad makes the headline look like something other than what it was.