Head Count

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Head Count

1. The number of persons in a given group.

2. The act of counting said persons.
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But at John A Logan, the 10th-day head count for spring 2018 was 19.6 percent lower than spring 2017, and total credit hours dropped 4 percent.
As the researchers suspected, the use of a simple head count of primary care physicians yielded a "modest" association between the number of primary caregivers and improved patient outcomes, including lower mortality.
* A simple head count of 155,729 physicians listed as family physicians or general internists in the 2007 AMA Master--file in several designated geographic service areas.
The total rural and urban estimated generalist head counts for a single provider type is calculated (equation 1):
If SMOBE/SWOBE data are used, a choice must be made between using the head count data for all firms or for firms with employees.
In the meantime, Americans should stand up and be counted in favor of a 2010 census that relies on an actual head count to safeguard against political shenanigans and produce a result in which all Americans can have confidence.
But at John A Logan, the 10th day head count for spring 2018 was 19.6 percent lower than spring 2017, and total credit hours dropped 4 percent.
In a cost-cutting exercise, Centro has decided to strip bus drivers of the power to press a button every time a pensioner gets on a bus and go back to old-fashioned head counts.
Included is information on student headcount and credit hours, majors by specific college within the university, credit hours by discipline, and student head counts and majors at their branch campuses.
In a cost-cutting exercise, it has decided to strip bus drivers of their power to press a button every time a pensioner gets on a bus and go back to old-fashioned head counts.
This is the challenge facing insurance company executives who oversee financial reporting: Greater demands for speed and accuracy in the face of cost-cutting and head count reductions.
"For example, one less student in a Business and Industry course equals one less in total head count, but just 0.5 to 1.0 less in credit hours, while one less student in a Career Education course equals one less in total head count, but might also equal 12.0 less in credit hours."