Hardship


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Hardship

A financial or personal need that must be addressed. For example, one may make a hardship withdrawal from a retirement account in order to pay for unexpected medical bills one may not be able to afford otherwise. Likewise, one may be able to cancel an employment contract early if a spouse dies and one must take care of one's children.
References in periodicals archive ?
(440) When addressing the employer's assertion of the undue hardship defense, the court stated:
Thus, the lingering question has been whether the TCJA intended to limit hardship withdrawals due to casualty loss similarly to deductions rendering them available for losses due only to federally declared disasters.
If you are applying for a hardship licence for work, one thing you will need to obtain is a letter from your employer, on letterhead, that includes your work hours and your need for the hardship licence in order to maintain your employment, and the letter cannot be more than 30 days old.
"Our results help us to understand one potential factor underlying financial hardship, which can have serious implications for people's well-being," said Matz.
"Loans are down 7%, so far, and hardship withdrawals are up 40%.
The firm has years of experience in helping immigrants with their cases, including deportation proceedings, hardship waivers, workers' visas, K-1 visas, and more.
'Many manufacturers have stopped producing unviable drugs and they filed for relief under hardship category to keep on providing medicines to the patients,' he added.
" Appellant was on notice that his license expired in 2009, and DEM provided Appellant with ample opportunity to be heard regarding his potential eligibility for renewal based on medical and financial hardship. DEM reviewed Appellant's renewal application and provided him with two full hearings on his appeal of the Division's denial decision at which he was able to present witnesses and legal arguments.
Allow me to share a few kernels of advice on using hardship as a catalyst for positive change:
class="10PalatinoTextbull Adding "extreme hardship" as a requirement for a fraud waiver.
The greatest hardships are found in younger survivors.