Hard Money


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Hard Money

A currency backed by a tangible commodity such as gold, silver, or platinum. Hard money has an intrinsic value, but is more susceptible to deflation than fiat money. Many countries used hard money throughout most of their histories; indeed, in the United States there was a significant debate in the late 19th century about whether the dollar should be based on gold or silver. However, most countries today use fiat money and have since the United States left the Bretton Woods System in the 1970s.
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With a hard money lender you can avoid these issues and this can make all the difference for whether or not real estate investor makes money or not.
Saletan correctly notes that I asked the Democratic Party not to run hard money independent-expenditure ads in my campaign last year, but at least the ads that did run were not paid for with unlimited corporate and union contributions.
Last year, Reno said that if Gore had used his White House office to raise hard money, the telephone calls could be considered a violation of a federal law barring government officials from raising political funds on federal property.
The Arizona hard money loan mortgage market has greatly expanded since the 2009 mortgage crisis with the passing of the Dodd-Frank Act.
Descartes confirmed it and said it bought the German firm for around 9.2 million euros, paid in hard money.
The accused persons deprived the general public of their hard money and used the ill gotten money for their personal gains.
DelShah Capital, LLC, a real estate debt acquisition, development and management company, has formed DelShah Lending to originate short- and long-term hard money, bridge and mezzanine loans in New York City.
One of our leading priorities for the next Congress must be revision of the law to clarify that groups that have the major purpose of influencing a federal election must obey the decades-old requirement that they register as political committees with the FEC, properly disclose their activities and comply with hard money limits.
Toner and Thomas were attempting to sway their fellow commissioners with a plan that would require 527s to abide by a minimum hard money (meaning contributions that are subject to FEC regulations) percentage of 50 percent when paying for certain public communication and voter drives that promote a particular political party or candidate.
But the tradeoff to eliminate this most notorious campaign finance "loophole" will actually enhance the power of wealthy special interests, for it loosens a whole series of strictures on hard-money donations--and hard money has already eclipsed soft.
Not nearly so meaningful, however, as it would have been in combination with the original McCain-Feingold reforms, and even less meaningful after a final round of compromises doubled "hard money" contribution limits for individuals from $1,000 to $2,000, increased the amount individuals can donate to candidates and parties during an election cycle from $25,000 to $37,500 and limited communication between advocacy groups and campaigns so much that the bill could be read to restrict legitimate public-interest lobbying.