Hamlet


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Hamlet

In Oregon, a political subdivision equivalent to a rural village. While hamlets are organized, they do not have the ability to tax and do not provide utilities.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is novel, and in the end so insightful about Lesser's approach, is that he does not set out in any direct sense to answer any of them, but rather to show how they have been raised and answered at particular moments in the editorial history of Hamlet since 1823: "We have been so busy trying to uncover Q1's origins .
Hamlet is perhaps Shakespeare's most performed play, in many languages and approaches.
The appearance of Q1 Hamlet changed this assumption in two ways.
But as my son - on his first Hamlet - said afterwards: "There were no likeable characters in it.
From the very beginning, Queen Gertrude becomes so mixed with the throne of Denmark that Hamlet diverted his resentment and expresses throughout the play a violent jealousy against his uncle's possession of Gertrude.
Before offering perceived limitations and critical evaluations to these two points of view, it should be noted that Shakespeare can be portrayed via the Hamlet text and the characters of Hamlet and Horatio as a far-reaching poet/proto-modern philosopher whose implicit commitment to an understanding of the philosophical nature of time, human thought, and being, as set in crisis by the mysterious Ghost, who becomes the pivot for a philosophical reading, which is more systematically and explicitly developed by later philosophical thinkers.
The text analysed is lines 170- 219 in Scene II of Act II in the play Hamlet by Shakespeare.
The role is often picked apart as a series of contradictory character studies - Hamlet the nihilist; Hamlet the psycho; Hamlet the jester and friend; and, finally, Hamlet the avenger.
And it seems that Isabella Marshall couldn't be happier about leading the cast in this all-female version of Hamlet from the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama.
For Litvin, Hamlet "encapsulates a debate coeval with the largely constitutive of modern Arab identity: the problem of self-determination and authenticity" (2).
Though Hamlet is not the only person in the play to see the ghost, he is the only one to whom the ghost speaks; and Hamlet remains skeptical until the play within the play that what the ghost has told him is reliable.