Haler

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Haler

A division of the Czech koruna equal in value to 1/100 of one koruna.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Poorer nations may find that stipulation difficult, yet airline-servicing companies worldwide must comply strictly with the halon specifications laid down by aircraft manufacturers and foreign aviation authorities.
Flyers may be comforted to know that the Montreal Protocol contains a clause that allows developing nations to temporarily restart halon production for critical systems if supplies fail--always supposing the necessary infrastructure exists.
Halon 1301 is the agent used in total flooding systems -- the kind that protect facilities' "hot spots," such as computer installations and electrical/telecommunications infrastructures.
The deadline has passed, but building owners are not really under the gun, says Gary Taylor, a fire protection consultant and chair of the Technical Committee for Halon, established by the parties to the Montreal Protocol.
Apparently some companies have already taken that bold step and are removing halon from their facilities.
Halon Security filters the traffic extremely fast, while at the same time, it allows for a large number of VPN connections and load balancing.
The administration of Halon Security can be carried out via a serial console or a web interface.
With Halon Security you will also be able easily define broadband limitations controlling how much capacity the different types of traffic may utilise.
The Halon 1301 fire protection system, the most widely used, works with devices that detect fires in the incipient stages and signal for the discharge of the Halon 1301 through piping to totally flood a protected area.
Only in critical defense, military, and nuclear facilities will Halon systems introduce concentration levels that can be life threatening.
Most of these extinguishers use halon 1211 as the extinguishing agent and nitrogen as the expellant; "blended" units use halon 1301 as the expellant.
Halon can be harmful if inhaled; however, quantities contained in household extinguishers don't usually pose a health risk.