Halftone

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Halftone

An engraving used to print an illustration, such as in a book or magazine. This word is most common in publishing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hillenbrand is rightfully proud of the numerous color and half-tone photographs and especially the three-dimensional drawings that illustrate every page of this book.
Business historians will especially want to read the concluding section of essays on consumption and illustration: "Iconography and Intellectual History: The Half-Tone Effect," "Color and Media: Some Comparisons and Speculations," "Pictorial Perils: The Rise of American Illustration.
The UF-766 features 64 levels of half-tone that's switchable between 16 levels in Fast mode and 64 level in Quality mode.
Exposing the chemical layer in the petri dish with a half-tone image initiates a pattern of oscillating reaction zones that together appear as alternating positive and negative exposures of the image.
The certification also enables remote proofing, proof-less workflows, ink jet and half-tone proofs.
It was mentioned: ability to prepare layouts, designs, and graphic art works; knowledge of relevant hardware, software, and file formats; knowledge to develop various types of illustrations such as line art, technical, half-tone, colour, etc.
The TH 8130 combines the advantages of flexo for half-tone printing of photo-realistic images plus silk-screen printing of solids and texts.
Some of the images appear abstract, such as the half-tone, dotted display of fragments of the flooring in the Grainger Market.
Taking each house in turn, Gordon conducts the reader on a visit, assisted by ninety-two half-tone plates and by six plans printed on a fold-out sheet inside the rear cover.
Includes original foreword and introduction, six chronologically-arranged chapters, separate indices of names and general terms, 682 black-and-white illustrations and twenty-four color and half-tone plates.
His eccentric father, George, director of the municipal band, appears playing his echo cornet and experimenting with half-tone scales - a radical experiment for the time, inspired both by his boundless imagination and, it turns out, by his reading of the work of the German acoustician Hermann von Helmholtz.