Half Duplex


Also found in: Dictionary, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Half Duplex

In telecommunications, a system that allows transmission between two endpoints, but not simultaneously. For example, if two people have walkie talkies, each may speak to the other, but the signal will not transmit if both try to speak at the same time. This contrasts with a full duplex, in which information may be transmitted both ways at the same time.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the half duplex system, the full duplex system requires two frequencies, one to transmit and one to receive.
Extended coverage with better link budget allowing LTE signals to penetrate through more walls and floors to reach devices deployed deep indoors or in remote locations Up to 10 years of battery life for typical delay-tolerant, low-throughput applications utilizing Power Save Mode and Extended DRX Lower complexity and cost due to single antenna and half duplex operation, up to 375 kbps.
Full duplex flow control per IEEE802.3X and half duplex back pressure, symmetric and asymmetric
This processor's dual Fast Ethernet controllers function at full or half duplex at 10/100 Mbps.
Supporting full and half duplex mode with flow control, the device allows reliable and simultaneous data transmission.
Full duplex flow control and half duplex back pressure, symmetric and asymmetric
The switches are available for 10/100Base-T, 4/16 token ring, and 10/100Base-T switched half duplex. --Digitech-LeCroy
The test results showed that the Full Duplex can provide self-interference cancellation capability more than 113dB in real world environment and result in a total 90% system throughput gain over the conventional half duplex mode used today.
As a result, they blocked the exchange of auto-sensing information, making it necessary to manually configure the hub, switch, or router port to either full or half duplex. In the best case, this required time-consuming intervention at the management console (or removing the cover to configure dip switches).
Most medium- and low-speed (T1 and below) bridges are already full duplex; however, virtually all high-speed bridges are half duplex.