Hacker

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Hacker

A person who infiltrates a computer system, usually in order to gather information. A hacker finds a way past the system's protocols. Some hackers do this simply for the thrill, though many others hack for nefarious purposes. For example, a hacker may be hired by a company or government to conduct espionage on a competitor or enemy. Other hackers freelance in order to find things like credit card numbers to facilitate identity theft and other crimes. However, the word is not always used in a negative context.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Navarro and Autry said: 'Lest anyone doubt that China's hacktivists operate under the protection of the central government, consider that China has the most heavily controlled Internet in the world.
This highly normative conception of these self-styled hacktivist sensibilities, and the networked environment they furnish, betrays the book's main shortcoming: It does not engage fully with the substantial critical literature surrounding them (e.g., Dean, 2010; Markham, 2014).
LulzSec turncoat Hector Xavier Monsegur, known as Sabu among fellow hacktivists, waged a proxy cyber war against 30 governments worldwide, including eight Middle East nations, while working as an informant for the US Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Daily dot reported.
Does Hacktivist have any special surprises in mind for the festival?
UK grime metal quintet Hacktivist are in Newcastle this weekend playing the O2 Academy on Sunday.
It is unclear whether the group of cypherpunks would approve of another hacktivist group's online activities done in the name of a tyrannical regime in Damascus, a regime that has used an Internet "kill switch" to stop Internet traffic out of it borders.
The hackers in the latest attack had used the identity of a hacktivist group, Anonymous, which in the past had launched a series of attacks against the websites of pro-North Korea organizations, according to the report.
The hacktivist group, whose members have never been identified, said it will launch cyberattacks on dozens of Korean websites on Tuesday, the 63th anniversary of the outbreak of the 1950-53 Korean War.
This article evaluates existing jihadist cyber attack capabilities, offers a case study on a leading pro-jihadist hacktivist, and examines the rise in interest in cyber attacks among proponents of jihadist activism generally.
A number of posts left on the hacked sites claimed to be the work of the global "hacktivist" group Anonymous and included messages praising North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un.
I WAS interested to read the article reporting that "hacktivist" group, Anonymous, had posted the details of supporters of the English Defence League ("Hackers 'publish details of EDL'", May 30).