HABITAT

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HABITAT

Formally called the United Nations Human Settlements Programme. An organization within the United Nations that aims to provide housing. HABITAT seeks to encourage sustainable cities and towns because of increasing urbanization worldwide. It was established in 1978 and is based in Nairobi.
References in periodicals archive ?
The vegetation survey of the habitats was carried out in June 2008.
We have shown how the CoRT thinking skills helped a teacher provide needed scaffolding for an open-ended science problem on bird habitats.
The primary or Silver Tier level is offered to landlords interested in listing with Citi Habitats and offers services such as rent roll analysis, quarterly vacancy reports, market watch reports, and several other services.
One reason for the battle over habitat (region where an animal lives): Their forest homes are rapidly disappearing.
Habitats that exhibit structural complexity have been shown to support higher numbers of species as compared with barren nonvegetated bottom types (Orth & Heck 1980).
Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to designate 941 acres along Little Rock Creek and nearby Santiago Creek as critical habitat, down from 1,480 acres included in the service's 2001 proposal.
The same event in 2002 drew enough interest for more than 20 sessions, says Marilyn Wyzga coordinator of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department's Project HOME program, which helps schools develop habitats.
No endangered species can survive without its habitat protected,'' said Peter Galvin of the Tucson-based Center for Biological Diversity.
has been certified as an enhanced wildlife habitat and named "Rookie of the Year" by the Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC).
cycles of life, but protecting their habitat can provide a lesson in cooperation.
By reintroducing these once very common habitats, we should have a greater capacity for more species,'' Harzoff says.
If someone could suggest to me what the anticipated changes in the weather and rainfall patterns might be for [the bird's] breeding and wintering ranges, we might be able to extrapolate some gross changes in habitats that may result, and then, with even less confidence, we might try to estimate what may happen to a habitat specialist like the golden-cheeked warbler in those landscapes," says Chuck Sexton, wildlife biologist at the Balcones Refuge.