Health Maintenance Organization

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Related to HMOS: managed care

Health Maintenance Organization

Commonly called an HMO. A nonprofit organization that offers health insurance to a group of persons and charges members of the group the same monthly premium. Most HMOs require policyholders to have a primary physician who provides referrals for specialists and other medical services. Without these referrals, medical care generally will not be covered. This fact has made HMOs somewhat controversial. However, they generally operate at a lower out-of-pocket cost to consumers. They trace their origins to the early 20th century, but became more popular after the Health Maintenance Organization Act of 1973.
References in periodicals archive ?
Key issues included the suitability of the HMO in the area due to the number of family and single household dwellings and increased noise at unsocial hours.
An HMO may provide coverage to a PLHIV if the applicant is undergoing proper medical treatment; the applicant has a favorable risk profile; and the results of the medical examinations required by insurance companies are within normal limits.
For more information, please visit www.charnwood.gov.uk/register_hmo_licences I am sure this letter will generate further correspondence in your newspaper but I wanted to update people on this work regarding our understanding of HMOs.
'In addition to the SCA for HMOs, the IC is set to issue rules on investment and valuation standards for HMO reserves within the year,' Funa said.
The Insurance Commission has given companies providing health maintenance organization (HMO) services one more month to ensure that they do not sell non-HMO and preneed-like products before they are slapped penalties for non-compliance.
Ceri Dunstan, from Shelter Cymru, said: "The poor condition of many HMOs is a concern.
More recently, however, health spending has accelerated, coinciding with changing market structure and declining health maintenance organization (HMO) enrollment.
In this article, we use a large, nationally representative data set of nonelderly persons who receive health insurance from their employer to estimate a risk selection effect between HMOs and non-HMO plans.
* More than one-half of HMO enrollees were age 65-74, a larger proportion than among FFS enrollees.
The care system itself is remarkably stable and resilient, as the push back against HMOs demonstrates.