formaldehyde

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formaldehyde

A colorless liquid with a distinctive odor, classified as a volatile organic compound because it can be emitted as a gas from certain solids and liquids, even at room temperature. Almost every building component contains formaldehyde in some amount. It is used as a component in glues and adhesives, and in paints and other coatings. Some claim it is a cause of sick building syndrome.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 4c presents the effect of PAH concentration on the HCHO removal percentage of P[A.sub.6]-g-LCX-PAH.
The effluent HCHO and/or any other product gas were usually monitored using an on-line gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID), thermal conductivity detector (TCD), or other formaldehyde monitor.
The organic products obtained are almost the same as for metallic electrodes in aqueous media, which are: [HCO.sub.2]H; MeOH and HCHO. However, the efficiency is not as good as the natural photosynthesis or that with metallic electrodes, mentioned above.
(2.)higher temporary NMOG (non methane organic gas), CO and HCHO (formaldehyde) values apply to HLDTs and expire after 2008;
In all cases and for both fuels, there is always a higher concentration of formaldehyde (HCHO) than acetaldehyde (MeCHO), despite the 10% ethanol in the RON 92 E10 fuel.
Amperometric HCHO sensor was fabricated by the method depicted in Figure 2.
The California Air Resources Board (CARB) enforces an Airborne Toxic Control Measure (ACTM) for HCHO emissions of 0.09 ppm for particleboard and 0.11 ppm for MDF and other composite panel products (currently known as CARB II).
McCoskey, "Sample drying to improve HCHO measurements by PTR-MS instruments: laboratory and field measurements," Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, vol.
Ions at m/z 257 and 241 were both formed from m/z 285 via the loss of CO and CO2, respectively, and the ion at m/z 241 further yields m/z 211 via the loss of HCHO. Based on these results, metabolite M2 was generated by oxidation of the exocyclic methyl group of emodin, and could be identified as o-hydroxyemodin.
Melamine (3.8 g, 0.03 mol) was dissolved in formaldehyde solution (14.6 g, 0.18 mol HCHO) in a 500 ml flask.