HM Treasury

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HM Treasury

The department of the British government responsible for advising on and executing economic and fiscal policy in the United Kingdom. Through Inland Revenue and Customs, it has oversight of tax collection. The Treasury traces its origins to the 12th century.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(H.M. Treasury 2001: cited in Liebling & Arnold 2005:57)
The United Kingdom, for example, created a tripartite regulatory and oversight system consisting of the Bank of England, the H.M. Treasury, and a Financial Services Agency (a national regulatory agency for all financial services).
24, 2008 the High Court of Justice, Queen's Bench Divison, Administrative Court in A,K, M Q & G and H.M. Treasury, [2008] EWHC 869 has ruled and quashed orders enforcing UN Counterterrorism measures 1373 and 1267, so the point of this paragraph seems increasingly appropriate.
The high level of mortgage debt and high share of variable rate mortgages also means that the monetary transmission mechanism acting through the housing market is relatively strong in the United Kingdom, certainly in comparison to the major continental European countries, as emphasised in the Treasury's EMU study (H.M. Treasury, 2003a).
H.M. Treasury (2003), Housing, Consumption and EMU, Study as part of the Assessment of UK membership of EMU.
Not unless H.M. Treasury underwrites the bonds, they won't.
Peter then went on to say that he had exchanged Scottish money without difficulty throughout the world and he would be raising the matter with H.M. Treasury and the Bank of England.
An update of official fiscal projections in the (December) 2003 Pre-Budget Report (PBR) suggests that the government deficit, on a Maastricht basis, is expected to be around 3 1/4 per cent of GDP in fiscal year 2003, compared to the (April) 2003 Budget forecast of 2 1/2 per cent of GDP (H.M. Treasury, 2003a, 2003b).
This result is in accordance with studies by H.M. Treasury and the Confederation of British Industry[2].