Growth rates


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Related to Growth rates: Economic Growth Rates, GDP Growth Rates

Growth rates

Compound annual growth rate for the number of full fiscal years shown. If there is a negative or zero value for the first or last year, the growth is N.M. (not meaningful).

Growth Rate

The amount by which a variable increases over a given period of time as a percentage of its previous value. For example, a 3% growth rate in GDP for a year means that the value of an economy is 103% of the value of the previous year.
References in periodicals archive ?
The flat overall growth rate for the global market is due to flat-to-negative growth rates in the US, thirteen countries in Western Europe, and six countries in Asia Pacific," adds Adkins.
As it is evident from the table above the standard deviations are statistically significant which proves a variation in the SDP growth rates of different states.
We also computed the model with the premium growth rates adjusted for the average growth for each year.
Out of 24 emerging economies, only four are expected to have higher growth rates in 2005 than in 2004: Egypt, India, Israel, and South Africa.
Each person can expect doubling of living standards -- but only if new higher growth rate is maintained through 25 years.
We discovered that the actual growth rate of individual .
Still, supply-siders find solace in the fact that the annual average growth rate increased in these years compared to the previous 18.
The recession's effect on sales put a brake on the growth rate (See "Facing An Uphill Battle," November 1991).
The growth rates of three individual series within the machinery group--construction and mining machinery, metalworking machinery, and general industrial machinery--revised down between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2 percentage points by 1989.
The greatest growth by volume will be for bromine-based, phosphorus-based and melamine-based flame retardants, due to growth rates in plastics and wood/paper applications.
America's population is growing by some 1 percent per year, while Europe's is broadly stable, so comparing GDP growth rates tell us little about how well each economy is doing at delivering the goods for its citizens.