Grosz


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Grosz

A division of the Polish zloty equal in value to 1/100 of one zloty. The plural of grosz is groszy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grosz is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of AAAI, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a corresponding fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.
Grosz' instructor back then was more than a teacher: He was a mentor who helped Grosz get an internship after just two months in the program.
Durante la etapa dadaista, Grosz, Heartfield y Herfelde se habian implicado en el movimiento comunista de los trabajadores y habian producido pequenas revistas politicas a traves de Malik Verlag sin referencia al dadaismo.
Grosz concludes that the man has a desire to shock others and his self-harm is used as a means to express himself and deal with his troubled childhood days.
At this one-day shoot, he shot some TV spots with Jagodowski and Grosz in the morning, then filmed "Train Your 'Buds" in the afternoon.) The costumes are all cheesy '80s fitness outfits--sweatbands, short shorts, Lycra and Spandex--in the brand colors of red, blue and gold.
Throughout his book, Grosz provides not a definition, but an enactment of the purpose of psychoanalysis, [one] which is both modest and profound," said Alexander Linklater of The Guardian.
Anthony Ward's triumphant sets, inspired by German Expressionist George Grosz, look terrific, revolving and rising up out of the floor, and towering over the proceedings in an ideally threatening and atmospheric manner.
THE EXAMINED LIFE: HOW WE LOSE AND FIND OURSELVES, BY STEPHEN GROSZ HAVE you ever wondered what psychoanalysts really think of their patients?
Portraits by Dix, Grosz, Beckmann, and Schlemmer embody the potential intensity of loaded weapons.
* A dispute over works by artist George Grosz is revealing the role a German Jewish dealer played in reselling "degenerate" art confiscated by the Nazis in the United States.
He became involved in one of the more bizarre chapters of Oregon football history in 1960, when he was approached by two professional gamblers and offered $5,000 to help "fix" Oregon's game at Michigan, and $5,000 more if he could get quarterback Dave Grosz involved.