grey market

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Related to Grey economy: black economy, Informal economy, Gray economy

Gray Market

Trade using unofficial and unregulated, but still legal, means. In securities, a gray market typically refers to trade in bonds or stocks not yet issued. These sales are contingent upon the issuance actually taking place, and are sometimes considered benchmarks for how successful the issuance will be. Another example of a gray market is the pharmaceuticals industry, in which buyers in different countries sometimes pay very different amounts. Buyers in the more expensive country may travel to the other country to buy their medicines, creating a gray market.

grey market

an ‘unofficial’ market in newly issued shares prior to their being formally listed and traded on the STOCK EXCHANGE. See SHARE ISSUE.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the Egyptian economy deteriorating and job opportunities in short supply, many Egyptians are trying to cover their expenses through the massive grey economy, which operates outside the tax system and most government regulation.
The grey economy ballooned in the 1990s when economic reforms eroded the Socialist-influenced, centralised economy in favour of the private sector.
They said that the plan would have grave consequences for unemployment and the grey economy and would slow recovery.
The days when the grey economy used the book as a sort of alternative unit of currency appear over.
And as I reach the hotel, through the leafy cobbled streets and cafE[umlaut]s of downtown Sofia, it truly feels like a European capital, but the headline in the local paper in tells me the grey economy accounts for at least 37 per cent of GDP.
Thirdly, there appears to be a strong correlation, and possibly causation, between corporate governance failures and the grey economy.
Many who come here illegally end up in jobs in the grey economy, which not only puts them at risk from unscrupulous employers but undermines the terms and working conditions of others.
It says such an amnesty would be a positive move by the Government to tempt those in the grey economy to step out of the shadows and be recognised for future contributions to the tax burden we otherwise all share.
Like the story about A-levels getting easier, this one about the grey economy is becoming a hardy perennial.
This latter is potent enough to have allowed the growth of a grey economy (where much of income and earnings are kept secret) to an astonishing 40% of the total economy according to Ms Slagana Taseva, executive director of Transparency International Macedonia, the world-wide agency that rates countries for financial honesty and efficiency.
NORDIC BUSINESS REPORT-29 November 2005-Finnish police expose large grey economy operation - report(C)1994-2005 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD http://www.