Great Society


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Great Society

A series of programs launched by U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson in the 1960s to improve quality of life for Americans. The Great Society saw a number of innovative programs. Some were more successful than others. Medicare and Medicaid, which greatly reduce medical expenses for the elderly and the poor, proved popular though expensive. Food stamps were intended to improve food security, though critics maintain that they encourage recipients to eat unhealthily. The Great Society also increased federal funding for universities and created the National Endowment for the Arts.
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In those tumultuous Great Society years, the President submitted, and Congress enacted, more than 100 major proposals in each of the 89th and 90th Congresses.
At Great Society Cider and Mead, for instance, a flight of four 4-oz.
As these roles have been shifted to the Great Society, parents now view children in self-actualizing ways.
To begin with, she remains true to the ideals and vision of the Great Society. This was clear in her speech after her victory in the Nevada caucus last Saturday.
The final case study evaluates the impact of Great Society funding upon Waco during LBJ's presidential years.
Conversely, LBJ's Great Society attempted, in part, to transform the underclass via community action agencies; it utterly failed.
[H]ere is the Great Society. It's the time--and it's going to be soon--when nobody in this country is poor....
The depth of intellect and passion with which Sanchez battled the diluted educational opportunities left for minority students is rivaled only by the vast range of practices of marginalization that Sanchez attacks with passion and pride as "the single most important Mexican American intellectual between the Great Depression and the Great Society" (x).
We must use Diversity to create a Great society. (E-mail fllobo@gmail.com)
Fifty years ago this Thursday, at the University of Michigan, Johnson had proposed legislating into existence a Great Society. It would end poverty and racial injustice, "but that is just the beginning.'' It would "rebuild the entire urban United States'' while fending off "boredom and restlessness,'' slaking "the hunger for community'' and enhancing "the meaning of our lives'' -- all by assembling "the best thought and the broadest knowledge.''
May 22, 2014, marks the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon Baines Johnson's "Great Society" address, delivered at the spring commencement for the University of Michigan.
They present six case studies, winners of the Rudy Bruner Award, that offer policymakers hope for recovering from what they describe as the excesses and failures of Great Society social tinkering and the callous neglect of the Reagan era.

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