Nanotechnology

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Nanotechnology

The technology that controls products at the atomic or molecular state. Nanotechnology has uses in information technology, heavy industry and energy.
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References in periodicals archive ?
New Study On "2019-2024 Monolayer Graphene Film Market Global Key Player, Demand, Growth, Opportunities and Analysis Forecast" Added to Wise Guy Reports Database
Tunghsu Optoelectronics is a leader in China's graphene industry and has seen its graphene-related business grow rapidly in recent years.
Blass said it's because graphene batteries are "capable of a full charge in under a half-hour."
The AG--AB reaction causes an instantaneous change in the graphene channel resistance (current flow), which can be recorded by modern electronic equipment.
A major new part in this particular jigsaw has been filled in with the opening at the end of last year of the Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) In the Maslar Building on Manchester University's campus.
Among the different strategies to produce graphene, the lower price and ease of production of mass produced graphene obtained by mechanochemical exfoliation of graphite are also attracting the attention of the industries [25].
Two researchers at University of Manchester in England the researchers were awarded in 2010 the Nobel Prize in Physics for their work that led to graphene.
Typically, polycrystalline graphene is used in applications which need to be integrated over wafer scalc, however this material presents grain boundaries between the different crystals that lower the exceptional electrical properties that have been measured in the exfoliated single crystals that made graphene famous.
The PS60m Graphene Engineering and Innovation Centre - known as GEIC - will allow companies to team up with academics to test new products before taking them to market.
Dubbed a "miracle material" by some engineers, graphene is 200 times stronger than steel and one of the most conductive materials in the world.
In the collaborative study, recently published in Nature Materials, ICFO researchers Renwen Yu and Professor Javier Garcia de Abajo, in collaboration with a group led by Professor Fengnian Xia at Yale University, used graphene to detect mid-infrared light efficiently at room temperature and convert it into electricity.