Grandfather clause

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Related to Grandfather rights: Grandfathered in

Grandfather clause

A provision included in a new rule or regulation that exempts a business that is already conducting business in the area addressed by the regulation from penalty or restriction.

Grandfather Clause

A clause in a new law, regulation, or anything else that exempts certain persons or businesses from abiding by it. For example, suppose a country passes a law stating that it is illegal to own a cat. A grandfather clause would allow persons who already own cats to continue to keep them, but would prevent people who do not own cats from buying them. Grandfather clauses are controversial, but they are also relatively common.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grandfather rights currently allow sprayer operators born before December 31, 1964, to apply pesticides without needing a certificate of competence, providing they use pesticides on a holding that they or their employer own or rent.
The exemption, known as 'Grandfather Rights', will end with a change in the law on 26th November 2015.
CHANGES to so-called grandfather rights - exemptions to pesticide use for people above a certain age - are bitter-sweet, says the CLA in the North.
Other potential reforms included strengthening rules on transparency, reducing 'grandfather rights' of old incumbent utilities, and reforming regulation of the international segments of gas grids.
This creates the conditions for a total of up to 41 roundtrips per day by competing airlines to emerge on the affected routes, according to the Commission, which added that a new operator could also, after a certain period, acquire so-called "grandfather rights" (the long-term rights to a slot held by the incumbent operator) over the slots obtained for the Zurich-Frankfurt and Zurich-Munich routes, provided that it offers the service in this route for at least three years.
They were allowed to operate because they received approval before 1994, giving them 'grandfather rights' to operate, it was claimed.
Paribas previously controlled Companies in reliance on grandfather rights established by section 8(c) of the International Banking Act.
To those who still insist on term limits, I'd make a suggestion: no grandfather rights for incumbents.