Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act


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Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1985, that mandated automatic cuts in federal discretionary spending if the government deficit rose above stated target levels. The severity of the cuts was considered draconian and the Act was found largely unconstitutional in 1987. It was replaced by the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps most notably, determined efforts to reduce budget deficits over the long run--such as the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act and the Budget Control Act of 2011--dissipate in fairly short order.
As of mid-September, Congress was debating changes to the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act to strengthen the enforcement mechanisms and raise the target deficits.
He argues that the deficits that were projected before the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act and the 1985 Congressional Budget Resolution could radically overheat the economy.
However, a careful review of the experiences after the 1974 congressional budget reform and the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act would suggest the difficulty of solving the deficit problem through institutional reforms of Congress and the paramount importance of politics in congressional budgeting.
When Congress enacted what became known as the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act 9 months ago, it was believed that a course had been found to bring the Federal deficit under control.
The third and potentially most damaging measure is the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act. Although it was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court, the act fed budget-balancing fever, which Congressional sources warn, could lead to a further cut in U.N.