Governor

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Governor

1. The head of a bank, especially but not necessarily a central bank. For example, the highest post in the Bank of England is called the Governor.

2. More generally, a term for some chief executives, especially heads of political subdivisions. For example, the head of an American state is called a governor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Edwards's ending corresponds to Thomas Elyot's telling of the tale in The Boke Named the Governour, but both diverge from the Pythagorean account of the pair recounted in the fourth century in On the Pythagorean Way of Life.
Some Generals of Armies, and Governours of Cities, Townes, &c.
(135.) A Proclamation, By the Honourable John Nansan, Esq; Lieutenant Governour and Commander in Chief of His Majesties Province of New-York, and Territories Depending thereon in America, &c (1699) (copy on file with author).
(190) Phillips, Tangier, 29, 67-8 ("The Governours House is very noble, large and commodious, and owes its beauty and conveniences to the care and generosity of that excellent Person, the Earl of Middleton, the late Governour ...
is such.., whereby the Governour with the Council and Assembly are
(21) An obviously antithetical pedagogy is proposed by Thomas Elyot in his The Boke Named the Governour (1531), in which educational results depend entirely on the cultivation of a relationship between the child and the people surrounding him.
In a later scene, Caiphas and Anna, the high priests of Jerusalem, praise him as the best governour and Anna adds that they onour hym as champyon on euery stownde.
In the words of James Madison, "before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governour of the Universe." For this reason, limited republican government under God depends crucially on its citizenry 's moral and religious conduct.
this Country wants nothing but to be People'd with a well-born Race to make it one of the best Collonies in the World, but for want of a Governour we are Ruled by a Councill, some of which have been perhaps transported Criminals, who having Acquired great Estates are now become your Honour, and Right Worshipfull, and Possess all Places of Authority; there are amongst'em some honest Gentlemen who now begin to take upon'em, and Manage Affairs as they ought to be.
Before any man can be considered as a member of Civil Society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governour of the Universe: And if a member of Civil Society, who enters into any subordinate Association, must always do it with a reservation of his duty to the General Authority; much more must every man who becomes a member of any particular Civil Society, do it with a saving of his allegiance to the Universal Sovereign.
(6) The poet's allusion to Thomas Elyot's famous prose work, The Boke Named the Governour, modifies an ethos of nature that can be ascribed to Tudor Humanism (Moody 208-11).
Some have traced the origins of this departure to a debate between Governour Morris and James Wilson during the drafting of the Constitution: "Morris was concerned that the `law of nations' [mentioned in the Offenses Clause] would be too imprecise to constitute federal law, and [he] wanted to ensure that Congress had the power--and even the responsibility--to codify specific crimes."(209) Consequently, Congress was granted the right "to define" offenses against the law of nations.(210) Once the potential "vagueness" of the law of nations, as well as of the natural law, had been admitted, the window to self-interpretation was open.