Goldbug

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Goldbug

Analysts who recommends gold as an investment/hedge. Also, an investor who has a penchant for gold and gold stocks.

Gold Bug

An investor or investment adviser who keeps a portfolio consisting largely or exclusively of gold and gold-related products, especially when most other investors are not doing so. A gold bug may believe that the economy is about to undergo a period of high inflation or that a speculative bubble is about to burst. He/she invests in gold because it tends to maintain its value, even in bad economic times, and because it is usually protected from inflation. Other investors often believe that gold bugs are alarmists. In the late 2000s recession, some gold bugs were associated with the Austrian School of economics, but this is not always the case. See also: Peter Schiff.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although goldbugs appear to be metallic, they don't actually contain gold--so don't think you'll get rich collecting them!
Drowned out by the goldbug voices calling for the resumption of the gold standard, advisors urging investment in gold, and all of the media hype over gold's record-breaking prices, the historical context of gold's role in economic crisis has been stripped from public discourse.
(See "Goldbug Variations," below.) In the late 1970s, South African Krugerrands became a refuge from soaring interest rates and oil prices.
In his analysis of the arguments put forth by the goldbugs and the silver men during the gold-standard controversy, Michaels notes that for all their political differences, the two camps shared a tendency to see precious metals as "nature embodied" (147).
new world, dominated by what he called "goldbugs" and
It's clear enough that Alan Greenspan and other so-called "goldbugs" at the Fed feel more secure knowing the precious metal is there.
In Goldbugs and Greenbacks, Gretchen Ritter expresses a concern that too much history is written by "winners" who connect the dots to inevitable conclusions.
Although I found the two major theses of Goldbugs and Greenbacks convincing, a book this bold and broad inevitably raises additional questions.
Are Eckes and Buchanan prepared to smear all goldbugs and abolitionists as incipient Marxists too?
Beneath the concrete dome of the Dallas Convention Center, little old ladies in tennis shoes sit patiently next to their husbands, goldbugs, third-party hopefuls, and even stranger breeds of the Grear Discontented who have each paid $135 "to be a part of history," under the auspices of United We Stand America and its billionaire leader, Ross Perot.
The "Silverites," consisting of democrats and populists, found their voice in the personage of William Jennings Bryan, senator from the state of Nebraska, while the "Goldbugs," and most of the gold, was controlled by New York banker J.P.
Gold Stocks Are Not Just For Goldbugs. Forbes, 115(April 1): 78-79.