Till

(redirected from Glacial deposit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Till

1. A term for government funds.

2. A British term for a cash register.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
If the precise causative linkages are still a little fuzzy, it is evident that the ancient glacial deposits cannot be studied in the absence of discussion of plate tectonic and basinal setting (Crowell, 1999).
[Mg.sup.2+] concentrations are consistendy high in local groundwaters because as water percolates into the soil and moves through the aquifer it comes to equilibrium with the dolomite [CaMg[(C[O.sub.3]).sub.2]] in the glacial deposits (Jin et al., 2008).
"We want to create some maps that show the thickness of the glacial deposits, sand and gravel, because that makes a big difference if you're thinking of putting in a (heat) pump for your house.
In Canada, and other glaciated regions, they are interbedded with glacial deposits and have been most useful in determining periods of sedimentary nondeposition, and interpreting interglacial climates.
HRSC has also spotted glacial deposits in equatorial and mid-latitudes, including the flanks of the giant Tharsis volcanoes.
In addition to lithology and mineralogy of glacial deposits mentioned above, the published results include those on stratigraphy of Quaternary sediments, topography of Estonian bedrock, evolution and geomorphology of the Quaternary cover, evolution of the Baltic Sea and its ancient coastal formations, distribution of erratic boulders, development of large lakes, protection and complex use of Estonian mineral resources, environmental history, and nature protection.
The deposit overlies Carboniferous rocks and underlies glacial deposits, and its setting is very similar to comparable, confirmed Cretaceous deposits in Nova Scotia.
Geology of the watershed consists of glacial deposits varying in thickness from zero to about 150 m (492 ft).
Stratigraphic detail of glacial deposits has a profound influence on the engineering properties of soil units.
Prest, at the turn of the century, likened the process of finding gold mines in glaciated terrains to "following the tracks of a fox to its den by following its footsteps in the snow." The modern term for the search for mineral deposits using glacial deposits is called 'drift prospecting.'
Brian Harland of the University of Cambridge when he noticed that glacial deposits (called tillites) from the Neoproterozoic era are found on rock outcroppings on every continent, with the possible exception of Antarctica.