Till

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Till

1. A term for government funds.

2. A British term for a cash register.
References in periodicals archive ?
1999) for whom 'the global distribution of glacial deposits of Neoproterozoic age suggests that the ice sheet of the time developed even to the equatorial area'.
Especially useful are those round in multiple till sections in the Northwest Territories, and in glacial deposits of various ages in Yukon.
Ned Bleuer, glacial geologist, Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, provided a publication and discussion on the complexities of glacial deposits and the use of megagroups to decipher till stratigraphy.
In Glacial Deposits and Glacial History in Eastern Fennoscandia (Gorbunov, G.
Groundwater flow in these thick glacial deposits might result in subsidence caused by dissolution of some till constituents, which could create depressions suitable for peat-land formation.
When Kaufman performed the isotope analysis, he found that the rock formed before the glacial deposits was chock-full of carbon-13.
A series of glacial deposits underlie the site, consisting of Lowestoft Till and associated outwash gravels formed during the Anglian glaciation (assigned to Oxygen Isotope Stage 12, c.
These trains are characterized by varying amounts of fresh (near source) grains of pyrope and eclogitic garnets, chrome diopside, picroilmenite and olivine contained within glacial deposits.
As Late Glacial deposits are widespread in the inter-drumlin hollows of the Saadjarv Drumlin Field (Pirrus & Rouk 1979), but deglaciation timing is poorly constrained due to the absence of radiocarbon dates, Lake Prossa, where the thickness of Late Glacial deposits varies between 2 and 3 m (Saarse & Karson 1982), was selected for future study.
But a newer theory is that they were brought from glacial deposits much nearer the site, which had been carried down from the northern side of the Preselis to southern England by the Irish Sea Glacier.
Tight (1894b) coined the term Lake Licking for a large lake formed by glacial deposits blocking the paleovalley at Hanover to the east and the damming of the southwest-flowing paleodrainage by some undetermined glacial or interglacial agent to the southwest.