ghetto

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ghetto

A term with its origins in eastern Europe, used to designate the part of town occupied by Jewish citizens. Now the term ghetto is used to describe any urban area suffering significant deterioration, often predominated by one or a very few ethnic or racial groups. Disputes often arise regarding whether lenders, insurers, and other service providers are engaged in illegal discrimination when they redline these neighborhoods, or whether they are assessing risks based on the quality of the infrastructure and not on any judgments regarding the inhabitants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Getto lo considero tra i piu importanti tragediografi minori dell'eta della Controriforma.
Getto spent a few days in New Orleans, in a house with someone she had never met before.
--Gary Getto, executive vice president of Surveillance Data Inc., is an analytics expert in the health care industry who developed EXOGIN, an artificial intelligence, linguistics-based technology enabling the qualitative analysis of large volumes of text.
1997; Getto and Ishihara 1998a, 1998b, 1998c; Wladyka-Przybylak and Kozlowski 1999).
For more information, phone Kim Getto at (707) 963-3388.
Longo's style is rather uncontrolled: he tends toward descriptions that go over the top, and the narration is sometimes clumsy with a careless use of vocabulary that now and again amounts to nonsense (e.g., "getto fuori il fumo come fosse acqua sporca").
"Since our last convention, we've added over 75 new stores, including our new partnership with CarpetMAX Canada," said Barth Getto, vice president of member relations.
(3) Italian scholars have been able to build upon the foundations laud by Levasti, Getto, Petrocchi, and Battaglia, and the study of exempla has also enriched the pursuits of art historians, most notably in the examination of the frescoes in the Camposanto in Pisa, which portry the Thebaid fathers and the Triumph of Death.
Attorney Ernest Getto, who represented Navegar, expressed heartfelt sympathy for the survivors, but insisted that "to hold the manufacturer of lawfully-made and lawfully-sold firearms responsible for it [Fern's rampage] would be wrong." And Stephen McCutcheon, an attorney with the Sacramento-based Pacific Legal Foundation, told reporters: "With increasing frequency, we are seeing special interests attempting to shift responsibility for crimes away from criminals and onto businesses, manufacturers, and landowners.