General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade

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General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

A treaty adopted by the United Nations aimed at elimination of international trade barriers between member countries.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade

An international treaty, originally written in 1947, intending to establish a framework for international trade, with the goal of the reduction and elimination of tariffs. Its provisions were amended a number of times since its promulgation, but its goals remained the same until 1995, when it was replaced by the World Trade Organization. See also: Doha round.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

A 1947 multilateral trade agreement designed to establish rules, reduce tariffs, and provide a setting for a solution to international trade problems. GATT agreements are of particular importance to industries and firms heavily involved in international trade. Changes or even discussion of changes in these agreements can have a significant effect on the prices of the securities of affected companies.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).

A General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade was signed in 1947 to provide an international forum to encourage free trade, reduce tariffs, and provide a mechanism for resolving trade disputes.

The Uruguay Round Agreements Act was ratified by Congress in 1994 to foster trade by cutting international tariffs, standardizing copyright and patent protection, and liberalizing trade legislation.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

see WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

see WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Repeated attempts to make the Geneva rounds work were met with failure because Moscow refuses to put pressure on the regime to engage in genuine negotiations.
As the Geneva rounds of talks over the last few years have failed to produce any significant outcome, the Russians have recently introduced their formula for talks through the Sochi option.
For his part, minister Steinmeier expressed his belief that previous Geneva rounds of talks on Syria did not end in total failure, for these meetings resulted in dispatch of much needed relief and medical supplies to civilians "in isolated areas," adding that holding further talks is necessary for maintaining the truce, acknowledging that it has been largely shaky.