General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade

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Related to Gatt Treaty: WTO

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

A treaty adopted by the United Nations aimed at elimination of international trade barriers between member countries.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade

An international treaty, originally written in 1947, intending to establish a framework for international trade, with the goal of the reduction and elimination of tariffs. Its provisions were amended a number of times since its promulgation, but its goals remained the same until 1995, when it was replaced by the World Trade Organization. See also: Doha round.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

A 1947 multilateral trade agreement designed to establish rules, reduce tariffs, and provide a setting for a solution to international trade problems. GATT agreements are of particular importance to industries and firms heavily involved in international trade. Changes or even discussion of changes in these agreements can have a significant effect on the prices of the securities of affected companies.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).

A General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade was signed in 1947 to provide an international forum to encourage free trade, reduce tariffs, and provide a mechanism for resolving trade disputes.

The Uruguay Round Agreements Act was ratified by Congress in 1994 to foster trade by cutting international tariffs, standardizing copyright and patent protection, and liberalizing trade legislation.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

see WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION.

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)

see WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The largest single revenue raiser in the GATT treaty alters the estimated tax treatment for U.
King reports that speakers and panelists at the meeting will examine key issues, including: excise taxes and equivalency;the GATT treaty and the small brewers tax differential; BATF trade regs and slotting fees; the three-tier system.
Bob Dole and Ralph Nader agree that Congress should go slow on the GATT treaty.
US trade negotiator Mickey Kantor will, the WDM contends, be pressing for a 15-year phase-out, instead of the 10-year phase-out period proposed in the draft Gatt treaty.