Gastarbeiter


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Gastarbeiter

A migrant worker in Germany. A gastarbeiter temporarily lives in Germany and is usually employed in manual labor. The word has become common in other European countries as well.
References in periodicals archive ?
Muktupavela is more in the mainstream frame of poor and abused female Gastarbeiter, while Lacitis describes the alternative culture of squatters and drug consumers.
Spengler also warned against off-shoring and the importation of Gastarbeiter at a time when most conservatives saw only the economic advantages.
no es ya la de lo exotico que nos fascina, ni la del buen salvaje originario y naturalmente puro, ni la del alter ego del filosofo que posibilita la apertura a otras culturas y la mirada autocritica, ni la del romantico "otro" misterioso y seductor, ni la de los pioneros que se arriesgan en la conquista de un territorio y hacen pueblo, ni siquiera la de los Gastarbeiter (trabajador inmigrante), llamados para colaborar en el desarrollo, sino la del intruso que irrumpe en nuestra casa comun y perturba el buen orden de nuestra sociedad acomodada.
As a son of a Turkish Gastarbeiter, I played football at a local club in Duisburg, Germany.
A visit to Germany to explore the situation of the Gastarbeiter or "guest workers," which, in Germany, comprise mainly Turkish immigrants, reveals similar divisions between the majority of Germans, who accept these immigrants, and far right groups such as the "German Freedom Party" or the Pegida, who are Islamophobic and instead scapegoat these immigrant communities.
Luton Airport is "one of the main places for processing the thousands of poorly-paid, poorly-housed East and Central European Gastarbeiter, those who largely constructed the 'New Britain' promised by the now defunct New Labour movement" (xi) while the City of London becomes the "neurotically protected undead capital of undead financial capitalism." (333)
of course germany is renowned for its anti-multiculturalist sentiments and the gastarbeiter' approach in its immigration policy.
West Germanys guest workers (Gastarbeiter) programme which began in 1955 in the beginning had a modest intake but the economic miracle wrought in the country through the European Recovery Programme and the sheer determination and hard work of the people necessitated the enlargement of the programme and soon it began to recruit workers from all over Southern Europe North Africa and Turkey.3
From the cinematic representations of the titanic and bloody struggles of World War II to various efforts at reconciliation, the Gastarbeiter phenomenon, Adriatic tourism, Yugoslavia as no-man's-land straddling "the Wall," and finally the post-1991 wave of NGOs in Belgrade, Sarajevo, and Zagreb, Vegel paints a portrait of the two countries as mutually dependent, at least in terms of self-image.
Grandes empresas como Siemens, Telefunken y Schering pierden 50 mil trabajadores en una sola noche y convencen al gobierno de Alemania Federal para que incluya a Berlin Occidental en el llamado "contrato de adquisicion de trabajadores invitados" (Gastarbeiter Anwerbevertrag) que se firma el 31 de octubre de 1961 con Turquia.
In the German "gastarbeiter" program, the contracts were fairly specific that the workers had to leave when asked.
En effet, dans les annees 1950, se met en place la politique du Gastarbeiter (travailleur saisonnier) consistant a recruter des travailleurs saisonniers faiblement qualifies, principalement dans les pays entourant la Mediterranee.