Diaspora

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Diaspora

The persons of a community living outside their area or ancestral homeland, especially but not necessarily as a community. A diaspora can create and sustain trade and other economic ties between two areas. For example, a businessman from one ethnic group may communicate with a relative in the homeland in order to set up an import-export company.
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The narratives he portrays in the conversation between the Diaspora and Israel suggest that Diasporic Jews are inferior to Israeli Jews in Israel because Galut Jews are not true Zionists, as demonstrated by their choice to exchange the harsh life in Israel for a calm and prosperous life in the Diaspora (sitting around "pots of flesh"--Exodus 16:2-4).
"However much it was argued at the time that nation-building justified the insistence of Ben-Gurion and his disciples on the supremacy of Hebrew and the elimination of the jargon of the galut,'" he wrote in Midstream (July/August 2004), "it remains a shocking legacy of its early years that Israel's government persecuted Yiddish in a way it never did to any other language that new immigrants brought with them."
According to Raz-Krakotzkin, this recognition would enable an understanding of "galut [exile] with binationalism," hence leading to the recognition of the "binational nature of the country's history and geography" (122).
When gentiles realize this truth, "they will come of their own accord and from genuine love to serve Israel." (33) Luzzatto utterly rejected the Christian teaching that Jews have sinned so grievously that they cannot be saved and that God who once chose them has rejected them and chosen another people (Christians) in their stead, as evidenced by the lengthy galut (exile).
Their next center was in Babylonia, ensconced in galut. Hazal set the parameters and standards of textual interpretation.
The destruction of the Second Temple and the displacement of the Jewish People in the "Galut" (exile) were not the end of the Jewish people and by no means the end of inner disagreements and controversies.
Lustig, who organized the Galut 2000 conference on which this book is based, is a US-born, Berlin-based translator involved with an informal Jewish group.
alienation ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], galut).
Gelber and Pierre Bouretz, in their respective treatments of visions of the end of Galut in the writings of Stefan Zweig and Gershom Scholem, stress the sense of ongoing exile in Palestine experienced after return even by these convinced Zionists.
I think that in order to liberate the Jews from the effects of the galut (extended exile) and establish a revitalized, authentic Jewish culture, Klausner had to confront the numerical success of Christianity and refute the claim that Christianity lies at the heart of Western, European civilization.