capital gain

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Capital gain

When a stock is sold for a profit, the capital gain is the difference between the net sales price of the securities and their net cost, or original basis. If a stock is sold below cost, the difference is a capital loss.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Capital Gain

In real estate and investments, the difference between the purchase price and the sale price when the sale price is more. That is, when an investor buys a security or real estate and sells it for a higher price, he/she incurs a capital gain. Capital gains in the United States are taxed at a lower rate than other income if the asset is held for longer than one year. One may use capital losses to offset capital gains to minimize one's liability for capital gains taxes; indeed, some investors do so deliberately. See also: Paper gain.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

capital gain

The amount by which proceeds from the sale of a capital asset exceed the cost basis.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

Capital gain.

When you sell an asset at a higher price than you paid for it, the difference is your capital gain. For example, if you buy 100 shares of stock for $20 a share and sell them for $30 a share, you realize a capital gain of $10 a share, or $1,000 in total.

If you own the stock for more than a year before selling it, you have a long-term capital gain. If you hold the stock for less than a year, you have a short-term capital gain.

Most long-term capital gains are taxed at a lower rate than your other income while short-term gains are taxed at your regular rate. There are some exceptions, such as gains on collectibles, which are taxed at 28%. The long-term capital gains tax rates are 15% for anyone whose marginal federal tax rate is 25% or higher, and 5% for anyone whose marginal rate is 10% or 15%.

You are exempt from paying capital gains tax on profits of up to $250,000 on the sale of your primary home if you're single and up to $500,000 if you're married and file a joint return, provided you meet the requirements for this exemption.

Dictionary of Financial Terms. Copyright © 2008 Lightbulb Press, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

capital gain

the surplus realized when an ASSET (house, SHARE, etc.) is sold at a higher price than was originally paid for it. However, because of INFLATION it is important to distinguish between NOMINAL VALUES and REAL VALUES. Thus what appears to be a large nominal gain may, after allowing for the effects of inflation, turn out to be a very small real gain. Furthermore, in an ongoing business, provision has to be made for the REPLACEMENT COST of assets, which can be much higher than the HISTORIC COST of these assets being sold. See CAPITAL GAINS TAX, CAPITAL LOSS, REVALUATION PROVISION, APPRECIATION, definition 1.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

capital gain

the surplus realized when an ASSET (house, SHARE, etc.) is sold at a higher price than was originally paid for it. Because of INFLATION, however, it is important to distinguish between NOMINAL VALUES and REAL VALUES. Thus what appears to be a large nominal gain may, after allowing for the effects of inflation, turn out to be a very small real gain. Furthermore, in an ongoing business, provision has to be made for the REPLACEMENT COST of assets, which can be much higher than the HISTORIC COST of the assets being sold. See CAPITAL GAINS TAX, CAPITAL LOSS, REVALUATION PROVISION, APPRECIATION 2.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005

capital gain

The taxable gain recognized from the sale of a capital asset. It is the difference between the sale price of the property and the adjusted basis.Tax laws routinely offer preferential treatment for long-term capital gains on property held for a certain period of time before sale. Capital gains may be offset by capital losses.

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Capital Gain

The gain from the sale or exchange of a capital asset.
Copyright © 2008 H&R Block. All Rights Reserved. Reproduced with permission from H&R Block Glossary