GNP


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GNP

Gross National Product

A measure of the value of what a country's citizens produce in a given year, whether or not the production occurred in that country. To calculate GNP, one takes the GDP and adds to it all earnings made by domestic citizens in a different country. One then subtracts from this quantity all earnings made in the home country by non-citizens. GNP is less commonly used now because it has become a less accurate tool for calculating what a domestic economy produces, as more countries have citizens working abroad.

Gross national product (GNP).

The gross national product is a measure of a country's economic output -- the total value of all the goods and services that it produces in a particular year. The GNP is similar to the gross domestic product (GDP), but not exactly the same.

Unlike the GDP, the GNP includes the income generated by investments owned outside the country by its citizens, and excludes any income earned on domestic soil by noncitizens or organizations based elsewhere.

GNP

see GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT.

GNP

see GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the GNP concept was seen as a useful tool to measure economic progress.
Water supply and sanitation infrastructure is likely to vary according to GNP and other factors; therefore it is unlikely that the precise dose--response relationships reported for Fiji would be found in other islands.
Anomaly 1: I never could understand how the gains from trade are to be captured in GNP accounting.
The models specifying two components of GNP that were compared were all of the form:
where: 'ny' and 'ne' are growth of GNP and foreign exchange rates.
Specifically, we estimate a number of vector autoregressions and ask whether consumer sentiment about the future Granger-causes GNP.
First and foremost, between 1991:Q1 and 1992:Q4, GNP growth was less than three-fifths as great as it was during the first seven quarters of the next slowest expansion, that following the 1973-75 recession.
Military spending averaged 10 per cent of GNP during the 1950s.
In order to increase our productivity growth by 1 percent which would return the American economy to its historic average and make an extraordinary difference in our private and public standard of living--our experts tell us we would need to invest 5 percent to 8 percent more of the GNP annually.
This will occur largely because of the wider economy's projected real GNP growth.
The advance in real GNP expected for 1992, though subdued relative to that during the early part of most previous expansions, is anticipated to reduce the margin of slack in the economy over the year.
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