Futures Position

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Futures Position

The state of owning or owing a futures contract, which is an agreement to buy or sell an asset at a certain date at a certain price. One has a long futures position when one owns a contract, while one has a short position when the contract is sold, especially sold short.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was when he built up the huge futures positions. He told Reuters that he only realised he was trading "live" when he saw he had reached losses amounting to a million euros.
Sentiment remains at very bullish levels, as indicated by the futures positions. The upbeat mood is set to cool, with profit taking pressuring prices in the near term.
Roll Yield: impact due to migration of futures positions from near to far contracts; and
The net-long futures positions in Brent crude as of April 7 rose to 218,930 lots, less than 8,000 lots from the record seen last June, when Brent was at 115 due to multiple supply disruptions back then.
Introduced in 1994, the Eurodollar bundle enables the simultaneous sale or purchase of one each of a series of consecutive Eurodollar contracts, leaving the user with a strip of individual Eurodollar futures positions.
We note that investors still believe in positive price dynamics at the long end of the OFZ curve because the ratio of open futures positions for long-term vs short-term federal loan bonds has reached a historical maximum of 2.0 (Figure 2).
The contract will also be fully fungible, allowing open interest to exist in Tokyo and for NYSE Liffe TOPIX futures positions to be transferred to the TSE at the end of each day.
Like stock indexes, commodity indexes track the composite price of a basket of long futures positions in physical commodities.
TOKYO - Tokyo stocks closed lower Thursday with the key Nikkei index dipping below the 18,000 mark for the first time in two weeks as the rises earlier in the day provoked heavy selling to unwind long futures positions.
Gold prices are more sensitive to US interest rates than industrial commodities because of the strong investment demand (futures positions) that have supported gold prices.
Filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission revealed that Springs' and WestPoint Stevens' futures positions as of March 31 were running in loss territory.