Address

(redirected from Forms of address)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Address

1. The physical place where a person or company resides or does business. Most places are on a road of some kind; each building on a road has an individual number so a person or company can receive mail at the address.

2. The place where a person or company receives mail. For example, one's mailing address may be a box at the post office. One can retrieve mail there.

3. A location in the World Wide Web where one can find a website. It is usually followed by a suffix such as .com, .org, or .net. For example, the address for TheFreeDictionary is www.TheFreeDictionary.com.
References in periodicals archive ?
Protocol tools: Etiquette and social intelligence, titles and forms of address, invitation and seating cards, food menus, itineraries, templates and checklists.
Sanders wants to re-attune us to the biblical forms of address that Hobbes and Spinoza wanted to neutralize as part of their own political projects.
Relationships are shaped, in part, around forms of address.
The present paper thus focuses on the sense and role of address in Shakespeare's plays and intends to reveal the meaning and expressiveness of certain forms of address in turn taking and at the change of the scenes.
The results showed that not only lexical items but also forms of address and epithets were asymmetric in terms of gender.
In order to receive assistance, the agency requires identification, two forms of address and proof of income, although agency officials also accept the word of their clients.
Over a two-year period the author interviewed more than 100 people on the topic of forms of address, noting the overall practice of naming in each firm, each person's own preferences for specific forms of address (including name avoidance), and each person's perceptions of the effects of different naming practices in his or her own company.
Among the areas he describes are social mixing and status anxieties, social integration and identification, forms of address, and connecting social and psychic processes.
Lord Chancellor Lord Irvine has launched a gaffe-busting guide for judges which advises on forms of address, clothing, religion and customs.