Address

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Address

1. The physical place where a person or company resides or does business. Most places are on a road of some kind; each building on a road has an individual number so a person or company can receive mail at the address.

2. The place where a person or company receives mail. For example, one's mailing address may be a box at the post office. One can retrieve mail there.

3. A location in the World Wide Web where one can find a website. It is usually followed by a suffix such as .com, .org, or .net. For example, the address for TheFreeDictionary is www.TheFreeDictionary.com.
References in periodicals archive ?
The distribution of positive and negative politeness as expressed by address is more or less regular throughout the play, with no more than three forms of address in succession expressing positive politeness followed by as many or fewer forms of address expressing negative politeness.
Like in Macbeth, in this drama the scenes in which forms of address creating positive and negative politeness interchange regularly are of less significance.
Negative politeness expressed by the standard but distancing forms of address among relations conveys the confusion of the King and his mother Elinor in this scene and their reserved attitude to the bluntly spoken Bastard Philip Falconbridge.
The exchange of the emphatically negative forms of address conveys the sense of independence between the arguing parties -- women of the royal families of England and France.
Negative politeness as expressed by address here implies the Lords' composure, anger and individual responsibility, their shock at the Prince's death and wrath, and the forms of address are most of them exceptional and low.
Although in standard usage forms of address among the nobility and the royal personages exclude the connotations of closeness and familiarity, these forms of address allow sufficient variations to imply friendliness and even affection.
Before considering the significance of address in the comedy Two Gentlemen of Verona, attention might be drawn to the fact that the number of the syntactically marked off forms of address is almost the same in King John and Two Gentlemen of Verona (295 and 301 items, respectively).