Foreign equity market

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Foreign equity market

Issues floated by foreign companies in the domestic equity market.

Foreign Equity Market

The trading of stocks issued in a certain country by a foreign publicly-traded company. See also: International depository receipt.
References in periodicals archive ?
Investing in foreign equity markets works in the same way as buying domestic equities with an added currency effect.
Europe and Japan remain favorite foreign equity markets and, for some strategists, India as well.
For end September, they still indicate great buying opportunities in foreign equity markets, primarily EMU markets that are substantially below their fair value index (Austria -48%, Italy -53%, Portugal -22%, Spain -31%) but also Japan on -29%.
Major foreign equity markets; key commodities including gold, silver and oil and 4Q currency ranges are also covered.
BNP Paribas is to act as Mediobanca's custodian bank on foreign equity markets. It will also function as its clearing agent on foreign regulated derivative markets.
As much as foreign equity markets offer great potential for reward, so too, says Colyer, do overseas bond markets.
ETFs afford a convenient gateway to the most aggressive investment instruments (think emerging foreign equity markets and commodities) and the most conservative, such as Treasury Bills.
Such reactions were common until the domestic and foreign equity markets started to recover, posting a positive 26 percent return at the end of 2009 and leaving most investors with the feeling of just stepping off an emotional roller coaster.
A frequently cited cause of home bias is the cost of information that investors face if they want to invest in foreign equity markets. A naive, back-of-the-envelope calculation seems to indicate that for some countries, including the United States, the perceived informational advantage from having better information on domestic assets can go a long way toward accounting for home bias.
According to Bethume 'airlines are uniquely handicapped because outdated laws limit our access to the foreign equity markets and prevent us from achieving true global networks, which customers demand.'
The pickup in activity from the second half of 1993 can be associated with the Botswana Development Corporation reducing holdings in listed companies and domestic institutions shifting their investment focus to foreign equity markets. Both made scrip available to foreign investors and in the 12 months to August 1994, foreign buying accounted for 75% of secondary market activity.
When Swedish companies began to approach foreign equity markets after World War II, it was not done through floatation of new equity, as was pointed out above.
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