Fordism

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Fordism

a form of MASS PRODUCTION characterized by a high degree of job specialization, so called after the pattern of WORK ORGANIZATION and JOB DESIGN extolled by American car entrepreneur Henry Ford (1863-1947). Large numbers of a product could be produced for a mass market using assembly line technology where each worker performs a single task over and over again. Although high specialization can have efficiency advantages this form of work organization is often associated with low levels of JOB SATISFACTION, high LABOUR TURNOVER and ABSENTEEISM and high levels of CONFLICT and INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this organization of industry and services, capable of replacing disciplines and linear verticality, it is necessary to have malleable workers and professionals with plasticity to interact and capture the dimensions that have been omitted or relegated by the Fordist organization of work.
As the Fordist model once produced stability with a set of industrial relations institutions, the system of accumulation has been unstable and has failed to balance the growth of aggregate demand with aggregate supply.
Since lifelong learning includes informal types of learning beside formal ones, mentions the continuity of everyday learning, and removes the limitations of age and space in formal settings of learning, it plays along with the shift from Fordist production models to the Post-Fordist ones--that is to say, the liquidation of welfare state and full-employment policies (Bagci, 2014a).
Once our new bank (the Greater London Enterprise Board) was established, our idea was to rescue such companies from the receiver, amalgamate them, and do all the things we were expected to do under the left Fordist model.
Arguably, employment relations analysis has been slow to integrate the globalisation of employment into theoretical frameworks originally founded on the Fordist economies of developed nation-states.
Due to a combination of inter-related features, including the exhaustion of the productivity-realising potential of mechanised Taylorism in lead sectors (De Vroey, 1984), the resistance of workers to intensified exploitation and job fragmentation (Braverman, 1974; Aglietta, 1979), the internationalisation of production (Ivanova, 2011), the erosion of US hegemony, the 1970s oil shock and the crisis of the post-War Bretton Woods financial institutions (De Vroey, 1984), Fordist countries began to run into serious, and ultimately insurmountable, obstacles from the early 1970s onwards.
These studies acknowledge that an increasing number of women entering the labor market has become a defining feature of advanced capitalism, thanks to the decline of the Fordist era (and the industrial male) and the gains made by the feminist movement; they contend, however, that this 'feminization' of work cannot be equated with gender equality (Jenson, 1989; McDowell, 2004; Walby, 1989).
When, in a 1960 essay titled "Il mare dell'oggettivita," Italo Calvino wrote that the sea of objectivity, that is, the commodification of social relations brought forward by Fordist industrialization, was in the process of submerging the subject, neutralizing its capacity to act upon reality (39-45), he could have not imagined the degree to which this condition was going to be radicalized by today's digitalized, post-industrial and deregulated labor market.
Steinberg argues that such media connectivity reflects a societal transformation from standardized mass production and mass consumption--a Fordist socio-economic culture--to a society that stresses fragmentation, experience, flexibility, fluidity, portability, and heterogeneity.
of Frankfurt am Main, Germany) examines the current realities and potential futures of collective bargaining in Chinese industrial relations, drawing lessons from a comparative examination of the formation and functioning of the historical models of collective bargaining in the US and Germany during the periods of the rise and fall of Fordist wage regulation.
Authentic[TM] argues for a three-part conceptualization of contemporary consumer marketing: from Fordist standardized mass consumption, through post-Fordist niche marketing, to contemporary neoliberal, individuated branding.
In defining the growth of the symbolic economy, the authors depend on the Fordist and Post-Fordist distinctions made by media political economists and have more to do with media practices than directly with the growth of the various media economies.