Agriculture

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Agriculture

The production of food through the raising of crops and/or animals. The development of agriculture approximately 9,000 years ago is considered to be one of the most important revolutions in human thinking, one that made civilization possible. The trade of agricultural products, such as wheat or coffee, gave rise to the first exchanges. Even now, agricultural products are among the most important commodities that are traded. Very often, agriculture may only be performed in certain areas. Zoning laws regulate where farming and ranching may or may not take place. See also: Agribusiness.
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References in periodicals archive ?
With the help of this money, members of the Malingo women's group could carry out collective farming and trading in food crops (palm oil, garri, food vending, etc.) within and out of Fako Division.
The urea requirement includes 4,000,752 tons for food crop sector, 11,304 tons for animal husbandry sector, 118,488 tons for fishery sector and 1,194,648 tons for the plantation sector.
Internally, government resources devoted to cash crops should be shifted to food crops. Any researcher will tell you that enormous amounts of resources are devoted, wastefully, to cash crops.
"The widespread effect of air pollution on food crop production is a prime example of the linkage that exists between the health and vitality of our economy and our environment," argues Dr.
The new regulations will however not compel smallholder growers of food crops to become part of growers' associations.
To his, and the RSS farmers' wing Bharatiya Kisan Sangh's pleasant surprise, the Gujarat government replied that it would not allow field trials for GM food crops.
Plant breeding technology has great impact as breeding of micronutrient dense staple food crops can deliver most of the micronutrients.
Permanent cover crops are appropriate in orchards, vineyards and border areas never planted with food crops. Keeping these areas in mixed flowering species--perennials such as clovers, or annuals that reseed themselves such as crucifers--protects the soil, supports pollinators and encourages insect diversity.
'In the future, we could see negative indirect land use changes if we increase production of biofuels from food crops very rapidly and significantly,' Borjesson said.
In the future, scientists could insert genes for these insect-killing proteins into important food crops, such as grains, so that plants produce their own insecticides, the researchers suggest.
"Rather than using food crops to produce biofuels, in the future we may be able to use algae, trees, the inedible 'woody' parts of plants, and agricultural waste.