fixed asset


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Related to fixed asset: Current asset, Fixed asset turnover

Fixed asset

Long-lived property owned by a firm that is used by a firm in the production of its income. Tangible fixed assets include real estate, plant, and equipment. Intangible fixed assets include patents, trademarks, and customer recognition.

Fixed Asset

An asset with a long-term useful life that a company uses to make its products or provide its services. Strictly speaking, a fixed asset is any asset that the company does not expect to sell for at least a year, but the term often refers to assets a company expects to have indefinitely. Common examples of fixed assets are real estate and factories, which a company holds for long periods of time.

fixed asset

An asset not readily convertible to cash that is used in the normal course of business. Examples of fixed assets include machinery, buildings, and fixtures. A firm whose total assets are made up primarily of fixed assets is in a less liquid financial position, thus entailing greater risk of a big tumble in profits if its revenues fall.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fixed assets represent the long-term tangible assets an organization uses to produce and deliver its products or services, and manage its operations.
increased more than the fixed assets, i.e., more than the real economy
Here is the problem: The standard balance sheet fails to match the CPLTD with the fixed asset that repays it--the taxi.
Sage FAS Fixed Assets solutions is a complete fixed asset management suite with an intuitive interface that's easy to implement, learn and use.
As of 2005, the fixed asset investment-to-GDP ratio has gone up to an astonishing 45 percent.
The value of the asset will be transferred to a fixed asset accounting system where the military equipment will be depreciated over its useful life (that is, until it is destroyed or processed for disposal).
Singapore had attracted S$9.2 billion in manufacturing fixed asset investments in 2000 and S$8 billion in 1999.
Industrial and retail companies were targeted because they owned large amounts of fixed assets and intangibles, making it more probable that they would have impairment losses.
First, since Compustat must have a complete, long-term schedule of depreciation and net fixed asset data so that we can infer annual net fixed asset investments, there could be intermittent missing data.
Therefore, to use the fixed asset portion of the balance sheet in the calculation of return on assets is going to require making an adjustment to the total asset value.