fixed-income security

(redirected from Fixed Investments)

Fixed-Income Security

A security with a guaranteed return. Common examples include bonds, which pay periodic coupons representing a certain interest rate, and preferred stocks, which are legally required to receive a specified dividend at certain times. Typically, fixed-income securities offer lower risk and lower returns than common stock and similar investment vehicles.

fixed-income security

A security, such as a bond or preferred stock, that pays a constant income each period. Price changes in a fixed-income security are caused primarily by changes in long-term interest rates.
References in periodicals archive ?
The share of domestic consumption in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has shot up to 94 per cent from the average of 90pc recorded for the past decade, as export earnings and fixed investments fail to edge up fast enough to rebalance the economy.
Despite a pickup in the volume of capital spending, the imbalance between fixed investment and consumption is widening.
The fixed investments during the current year are expected to grow to 15.
8 per cent of GDP while the fixed investment to GDP ratio grew marginally from 14.
While negative dynamics were recorded in many sectors of the economy, the three main contributors to the sharp fall in gross economic output were exports (down almost 36% YoY in 2009), fixed investments (down 17% YoY) and manufacturing (down 16% YoY).
Rosstat data on the structure of fixed investments by funding source reveals that bonds accounted for no more than 0.
If an increasing amount of money is going into fixed investments these days, we need to do better than that.
Some fixed investments are doing poorly to provide income, CDs and money market funds, in particular.
Fixed investments in industry would reportedly increase to EUR3.
One of the main criticisms concerning the characteristics of technology can be summarised as follows: (4) Vintage effects may influence the relation between past fixed investments and the physical capital stock entering the production function.
Traditional retirement planning approaches recommend that as Americans age, their portfolios should include an increasingly higher percentage of fixed investments, and a lower percentage of riskier equity investments.
After the boom: bust in business fixed investments, the manufacturing sector is left with excess capacity.