Fixed Currency

Fixed Currency

A currency to which the government has linked the value of another currency or, rarely, some valuable commodity like gold. For example, under the Bretton Woods System, most world currencies fixed themselves to the U.S. dollar, which in turn fixed itself to gold. A government may fix its currency by holding reserves of the other currency (or the asset to which it is fixed) in the central bank. For example, if a country fixes its currency to the British pound, it must hold enough pounds in reserve to account for all of its currency in circulation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The company said, "When compared with our 2017 performance, we expect improved acquisition adjusted fixed currency sales growth in all of our segments.
This fixed currency supply doesn't allow for economic growth, and the only way to accommodate more transactions would be with deflation; if prices drop, the same currency supply can accommodate more transactions.
Nevertheless, any imminent risk of de-pegging is mitigated by the GCC government's expressed willingness and ability to maintain the fixed currency peg over the short to medium term.
This card delivers a more secure experience for clients when they are travelling and gives them the peace of mind that they have a fixed currency exchange rate on all international spends," Suvo Sarkar, Senior EVP & Group Head, Retail Banking & Wealth Management at Emirates NBD, said.
The forwards market is pricing in a devaluation, it is pricing in a move away from fixed currency exchange rates.
Central banks face an impossible trinity or trilemma: they cannot maintain an open capital account, fixed currency and independent monetary policy.
Second quarter 2014 sales for the global industrial segment, when measured at fixed currency rates, rose 3% to $1.
Since early 2013, the country has faced food shortages, high inflation, and pressures on fixed currency exchange regulations.
The governor said: "Though lower than in July, reserve levels remain adequate to maintain the fixed currency arrangement and meet other international obligations.
Denmark has been singled out as a relative safe haven given the relatively more favourable public debt dynamics and the fixed currency regime.
Fixed currency sales +7% compared with fourth quarter 2011 pro forma adjusted fixed currency sales including Nalco operations.
Nielsen as its new global chief economist, and as head of Economics & Fixed Income/ Fixed Currency (FI/FX) Research, effective from September 1, 2011.