Pond

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Related to Fish pond: Fish farming

Pond

An obsolete Dutch unit of weight roughly equivalent to 480 grams, with slight regional variations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Control fish pond showed higher increase in fish biomass than the stressed pond at final harvest.
In the control fish pond, Cirrhina mrigala gained higher average total length increment of 489.632.28 mm, while H.
TWO-YEAR-OLD twin boys have drowned after reportedly falling into a fish pond in Fife.
Tobacco dust, being manufactured and promoted by National Tobacco Administration (NTA), as alternative boosts the growth of lablab, an algae and natural fish food, and serves as fish pond floor conditioner.
The pH of the fish culture ponds' supply water was significantly higher than the pH of the tap water, domestic sludge and fish pond effluents.
But with the programme's move to a new home at MediaCity UK, Salford Quays, it will be placed in a spot accessible to visitors, who will be able to see the Italian sunken garden and fish pond, designed by the late Percy Thrower in 1978.
WE ONLY have a small council house garden, but it has a privet hedge on both sides and a small fish pond full of goldfish.
aeruginosa and phytoplankton: The dominant species of phytoplankton which were found in prawn and fish ponds were green algae, dinoflagellates and euglenoids, whereas cyanobacteria were found in lower amount in fish pond.
One of the main causes of water quality deterioration is fish pond management.
A owner of a fish pound ignited the weeds nearby the fish pond beside the burned hill without paying attention so that the fire spread to the hill, said Liu Zhenliang, the leader of Forest Branch of Huizhou Municipal Public Security Bureau.  It caused the wildfire.
Whether you're interested in the business of farming fish, the science of aquaculture, or simply want to create a fish pond for your home garden, you'll want to browse the aquaculture web pages developed and hosted by the Agricultural Research Service's National Agricultural Library in Beltsville, Maryland, and Washington, D.C.