First Mover

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Related to First Movers: fast follower

First Mover

The first company that enters a new market. For example, the first mover may be the first soft drink company to come to a recently liberalized country. This helps the first mover dominate the market early so as to maintain a competitive advantage over the long term as other companies come to the market. The term may refer to Aristotle's concept of God as the first mover of the universe. See also: Barriers to entry.
References in periodicals archive ?
If first movers anticipate that second movers are more likely to complete trades where the price favors the second mover, then first movers find themselves in a situation similar to a first price auction; one could ask for a larger but less likely payoff or one that is smaller and more likely.
7) Figures in the middle column reveal little difference among average amounts sent by first movers in all four implementations of the investment game.
Second movers should return exactly what was sent (Y/X = 1), and first movers should anticipate this (E[Y/X] = i).
Customers, suppliers and competitors that are pursuing first-mover advantages will seek out other first movers with whom to partner.
If the large party is placed either second or fourth in the order, condition 3 is satisfied, and the rest of the argument above leading to proportional sharing among the first movers applies.
A similar but not identical timing advantage denied to first movers but available to followers is lower research and development costs.
They engage both their brains and their hearts in their work," says Nancy McGaw, director of the First Movers Fellowship Program.
Figure 1a presents the time series of the average transfers to different income groups from Type A (rich) first movers from rounds 1 to 10 in the investment game.
The self-regarding preferences model predicts that second movers will keep all of the tripled amounts sent, and knowing this, first movers will send nothing.
Generally, though, "The best time to enter (a new market) is usually right after the first movers have failed and when you have the experience of others to learn from," Dobrev suggested.
This behavior is an indication either that first movers want to give more money to attractive counterparts (taste-based discrimination) or that they expect attractive persons to reject lower offers (which is not taste based but rather based on expectations or, in a way, productivity).
He confirmed that substantial discounts are offered to first movers while subsequent licensees in the same industry category are subject to progressively higher rates.